Delivery to the lower respiratory tract is required for effective immunization with Newcastle disease virus-vectored vaccines intended for humans

Joshua M. DiNapoli, Jerrold M. Ward, Lily Cheng, Lijuan Yang, Subbiah Elankumaran, Brian R. Murphy, Siba K. Samal, Peter L. Collins, Alexander Bukreyev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Newcastle disease virus (NDV), an avian virus, is being evaluated for the development of vectored human vaccines against emerging pathogens. Previous studies of NDV-vectored vaccines in a mouse model suggested their potency after delivery by injection or by the intranasal route. We compared the efficacy of various routes of delivery of NDV-vectored vaccines in a non-human primate model. While delivery of an NDV-vectored vaccine by the combined intranasal/intratracheal route elicited protective immune responses, delivery by the subcutaneous route or the intranasal route alone elicited limited or no protective immune responses, suggesting the necessity for vaccine delivery to the lower respiratory tract. Furthermore, direct comparison of a vaccine based on an NDV mesogenic strain (NDV-BC) with a similarly designed NDV vector based on a modified lentogenic strain carrying a polybasic F cleavage site (NDV-VF) suggested that the two NDV strains were similar in immunogenicity and were equally protective.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1530-1539
Number of pages10
JournalVaccine
Volume27
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Newcastle disease virus
respiratory system
Respiratory System
Immunization
immunization
Vaccines
vaccines
immune response
animal models
Combined Vaccines
Disease Vectors
human development
Human Development
Primates
injection
Viruses
viruses
Injections
pathogens

Keywords

  • Immunization
  • Newcastle disease virus
  • Route of immunization
  • Vaccine
  • Vector
  • Virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • veterinary(all)
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Delivery to the lower respiratory tract is required for effective immunization with Newcastle disease virus-vectored vaccines intended for humans. / DiNapoli, Joshua M.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Cheng, Lily; Yang, Lijuan; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Murphy, Brian R.; Samal, Siba K.; Collins, Peter L.; Bukreyev, Alexander.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 27, No. 10, 04.03.2009, p. 1530-1539.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DiNapoli, Joshua M. ; Ward, Jerrold M. ; Cheng, Lily ; Yang, Lijuan ; Elankumaran, Subbiah ; Murphy, Brian R. ; Samal, Siba K. ; Collins, Peter L. ; Bukreyev, Alexander. / Delivery to the lower respiratory tract is required for effective immunization with Newcastle disease virus-vectored vaccines intended for humans. In: Vaccine. 2009 ; Vol. 27, No. 10. pp. 1530-1539.
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