Demand for nursing competencies

An exploratory study in Taiwan's hospital system

Huey-Ming Tzeng, Shaké Ketefian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• Along with increasing complexity of nursing services, hospital employers are demanding qualified and competent staff nurses for high quality clinical care. In Taiwan, disparities in the demand for competent nurses by employers and the supply produced by nursing educators still exist and require attention. A comprehensive understanding of the specific needs of Taiwan's medical care system for nursing services would help bridge the current gap between demand for and supply of competently trained nurses. • This exploratory study investigated hospital employers' perceptions of the extent to which the nursing skills identified by Cleary et al. [Image: Journal of Nursing Scholarship (1998)20(4):39-42] were needed for staff nurses in Taiwan's medical care system. There were a total of 21 nursing competencies and classification on these items was also implemented. • A cross-sectional, quantitative, survey design was conducted. Subjects' participation was voluntary, an information leaflet and an informed consent form was included in the questionnaire. A total of 89 nursing employers (nursing directors, associate directors, supervisor, or head nurse) participated, resulting in a 42.6% response rate. • Factor analysis grouped these skills into three factors: basic-level patient care, intermediate-level patient care and basic management, and advanced-level patient care and supervision. This study confirmed that levels of nursing competencies needed differed by type of hospital accreditation. These levels also varied depending on types of services provided, employers' professional titles and tenure of currently employed nurses. • The questionnaire developed for this study could be used as one of the tools to communicate demand and supply of nursing competencies between nurse educators and employers. These competencies could be used to develop a checklist for evaluating adequacy of nursing programmes in order to meet nurses' new roles and responsibilities and improve nursing care quality in the fast-changing health care environment in Taiwan.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)509-518
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Taiwan
Nursing
Nurses
Hospital Nursing Service
Patient Care
Patient Care Management
Supervisory Nursing
Consent Forms
Nursing Services
Nurse's Role
Accreditation
Quality of Health Care
Nursing Care
Checklist
Statistical Factor Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Demand
  • Hospital
  • Management skills
  • Nursing competency
  • Patient care skills
  • Staff nurse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Demand for nursing competencies : An exploratory study in Taiwan's hospital system. / Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Ketefian, Shaké.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 12, No. 4, 01.07.2003, p. 509-518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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