Deoxycorticosterone-stimulated bicarbonate secretion in rabbit cortical collecting ducts: effects of luminal chloride removal and in vivo acid loading.

J. Garcia-Austt, David Good, M. B. Burg, M. A. Knepper

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Abstract

To assess the role of cortical collecting duct bicarbonate secretion in the regulation of net acid excretion, we have sought to identify what factors influence the secretion rate. Net and unidirectional bicarbonate fluxes were measured in isolated perfused cortical collecting ducts from deoxycorticosterone-treated rabbits. The collecting ducts secreted bicarbonate at 11-24 pmol X mm-1 X min-1, confirming the high rate seen in earlier studies. Oral acid loading (50 mM NH4Cl drinking water) completely inhibited the net bicarbonate secretion. The bath-to-lumen flux was markedly reduced with acid loading, but the lumen-to-bath flux changed very little. In tubules from rabbits treated with deoxycorticosterone (but not NH4Cl), luminal chloride replacement with either sulfate or gluconate completely and reversibly inhibited the net bicarbonate secretion. The bath-to-lumen flux was greatly inhibited, but there was little change in the lumen-to-bath flux. We conclude: 1) High rates of bicarbonate secretion can be induced in rabbit cortical collecting ducts by chronic treatment of the animals with deoxycorticosterone. 2) When deoxycorticosterone-treated rabbits were made acidotic by oral administration of NH4Cl, the bicarbonate secretion was prevented, indicating that the systemic acid-base state of the animal may be an important factor regulating bicarbonate secretion. 3) Replacement of chloride in the lumen with sulfate inhibits bicarbonate secretion in the cortical collecting duct, an effect which may explain in part the decrease in urinary pH in response to sulfate infusions in mineralocorticoid-stimulated animals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe American journal of physiology
Volume249
Issue number2 Pt 2
StatePublished - Aug 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Desoxycorticosterone
Bicarbonates
Chlorides
Rabbits
Acids
Baths
Sulfates
Mineralocorticoids
Drinking Water
Oral Administration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Deoxycorticosterone-stimulated bicarbonate secretion in rabbit cortical collecting ducts : effects of luminal chloride removal and in vivo acid loading. / Garcia-Austt, J.; Good, David; Burg, M. B.; Knepper, M. A.

In: The American journal of physiology, Vol. 249, No. 2 Pt 2, 08.1985.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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