Derangements in peripheral glucose and oxygen utilization induced by catabolic hormones

Dennis Gore, R. O'Brien, H. D. Reines

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess if the derangements in peripheral glucose, lactate, and oxygen utilization that are observed in severely injured patients are due to the hormonal response to injury or are related to the extent of the wound. Design: Comparison study. Interventions: The catabolic hormones epinephrine, cortisol, and glucagon were infused simultaneously into the femoral artery of six healthy volunteers, thus simulating the hormonal milieu associated with severe trauma in an uninjured leg. Setting: Clinical research center at a university-affiliated hospital. Patients: Young, adult males deemed healthy by screening medical history, physical examination, and blood chemistries. Measurements and Main Results: Substrate net balance and indirect calorimetry measurements were performed before and then at the completion of 2 hrs of catabolic hormone infusion. Catabolic hormones elicited significant increases in leg glucose uptake and oxidation, and an increased net efflux from the leg of lactate and alanine. While leg oxygen delivery also increased, catabolic hormones failed to alter peripheral oxygen consumption. Conclusions: Catabolic hormones can elicit a similar peripheral metabolic response in an uninjured leg as that reported previously by Wilmore et al. in severely burned extremities. This finding suggests that the hormonal milieu associated with severe injury is influential in regulating peripheral glucose and oxygen utilization and that wound inflammation is not an essential component of this response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1712-1716
Number of pages5
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume21
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Leg
Hormones
Oxygen
Glucose
Wounds and Injuries
Lactic Acid
Indirect Calorimetry
Femoral Artery
Glucagon
Oxygen Consumption
Alanine
Epinephrine
Physical Examination
Hydrocortisone
Young Adult
Healthy Volunteers
Extremities
Inflammation
Research

Keywords

  • cortisol
  • critical illness
  • epinephrine
  • glucagon
  • glucose
  • hormones, catabolic
  • hypermetabolism
  • oxygen
  • oxygen consumption
  • wounds and injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Derangements in peripheral glucose and oxygen utilization induced by catabolic hormones. / Gore, Dennis; O'Brien, R.; Reines, H. D.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 11, 1993, p. 1712-1716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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