Dermatologic features of classic movie villains

The face of evil

Julie Amthor Croley, Vail Reese, Richard Wagner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Dichotomous dermatologic depictions of heroes and villains in movies have been used since the silent film age. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the hero-villain skin dichotomy in film by (1) identifying dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American film villains, (2) comparing these dermatologic findings to the all-time top 10 American film heroes quantitatively and qualitatively, and (3) analyzing dermatologic portrayals of film villains in depth. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this cross-sectional study, dermatologic findings for film heroes and villains in mainstream media were identified and compared quantitatively using a χ2 test with α < .05, as well as qualitatively. The all-time top 10 American film villains and heroes were obtained from the American Film Institute 100 Greatest Heroes and Villains List. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcomes include identification and frequencies of dermatologic findings of the top 10 film villains and of the top 10 film heroes. RESULTS: Six (60%) of the all-time top 10 American film villains have dermatologic findings, including cosmetically significant alopecia (30%), periorbital hyperpigmentation (30%), deep rhytides on the face (20%), multiple facial scars (20%), verruca vulgaris on the face (20%), and rhinophyma (10%). The top 10 villains have a higher incidence of significant dermatologic findings than the top 10 heroes (60% vs 0%; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American villains are used in film to highlight the dichotomy of good and evil, which may foster a tendency toward prejudice in our society directed at those with skin disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)559-564
Number of pages6
JournalJAMA Dermatology
Volume153
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Motion Pictures
Rhinophyma
Hyperpigmentation
Warts
Alopecia
Skin Diseases
Cicatrix
Cross-Sectional Studies
Skin
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Dermatologic features of classic movie villains : The face of evil. / Croley, Julie Amthor; Reese, Vail; Wagner, Richard.

In: JAMA Dermatology, Vol. 153, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 559-564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Croley, Julie Amthor ; Reese, Vail ; Wagner, Richard. / Dermatologic features of classic movie villains : The face of evil. In: JAMA Dermatology. 2017 ; Vol. 153, No. 6. pp. 559-564.
@article{5fb442a9a7b04754ab68c5c0df4ad79b,
title = "Dermatologic features of classic movie villains: The face of evil",
abstract = "IMPORTANCE: Dichotomous dermatologic depictions of heroes and villains in movies have been used since the silent film age. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the hero-villain skin dichotomy in film by (1) identifying dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American film villains, (2) comparing these dermatologic findings to the all-time top 10 American film heroes quantitatively and qualitatively, and (3) analyzing dermatologic portrayals of film villains in depth. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this cross-sectional study, dermatologic findings for film heroes and villains in mainstream media were identified and compared quantitatively using a χ2 test with α < .05, as well as qualitatively. The all-time top 10 American film villains and heroes were obtained from the American Film Institute 100 Greatest Heroes and Villains List. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcomes include identification and frequencies of dermatologic findings of the top 10 film villains and of the top 10 film heroes. RESULTS: Six (60{\%}) of the all-time top 10 American film villains have dermatologic findings, including cosmetically significant alopecia (30{\%}), periorbital hyperpigmentation (30{\%}), deep rhytides on the face (20{\%}), multiple facial scars (20{\%}), verruca vulgaris on the face (20{\%}), and rhinophyma (10{\%}). The top 10 villains have a higher incidence of significant dermatologic findings than the top 10 heroes (60{\%} vs 0{\%}; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American villains are used in film to highlight the dichotomy of good and evil, which may foster a tendency toward prejudice in our society directed at those with skin disease.",
author = "Croley, {Julie Amthor} and Vail Reese and Richard Wagner",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1001/jamadermatol.2016.5979",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "153",
pages = "559--564",
journal = "JAMA Dermatology",
issn = "2168-6068",
publisher = "American Medical Association",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dermatologic features of classic movie villains

T2 - The face of evil

AU - Croley, Julie Amthor

AU - Reese, Vail

AU - Wagner, Richard

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - IMPORTANCE: Dichotomous dermatologic depictions of heroes and villains in movies have been used since the silent film age. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the hero-villain skin dichotomy in film by (1) identifying dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American film villains, (2) comparing these dermatologic findings to the all-time top 10 American film heroes quantitatively and qualitatively, and (3) analyzing dermatologic portrayals of film villains in depth. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this cross-sectional study, dermatologic findings for film heroes and villains in mainstream media were identified and compared quantitatively using a χ2 test with α < .05, as well as qualitatively. The all-time top 10 American film villains and heroes were obtained from the American Film Institute 100 Greatest Heroes and Villains List. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcomes include identification and frequencies of dermatologic findings of the top 10 film villains and of the top 10 film heroes. RESULTS: Six (60%) of the all-time top 10 American film villains have dermatologic findings, including cosmetically significant alopecia (30%), periorbital hyperpigmentation (30%), deep rhytides on the face (20%), multiple facial scars (20%), verruca vulgaris on the face (20%), and rhinophyma (10%). The top 10 villains have a higher incidence of significant dermatologic findings than the top 10 heroes (60% vs 0%; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American villains are used in film to highlight the dichotomy of good and evil, which may foster a tendency toward prejudice in our society directed at those with skin disease.

AB - IMPORTANCE: Dichotomous dermatologic depictions of heroes and villains in movies have been used since the silent film age. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the hero-villain skin dichotomy in film by (1) identifying dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American film villains, (2) comparing these dermatologic findings to the all-time top 10 American film heroes quantitatively and qualitatively, and (3) analyzing dermatologic portrayals of film villains in depth. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this cross-sectional study, dermatologic findings for film heroes and villains in mainstream media were identified and compared quantitatively using a χ2 test with α < .05, as well as qualitatively. The all-time top 10 American film villains and heroes were obtained from the American Film Institute 100 Greatest Heroes and Villains List. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcomes include identification and frequencies of dermatologic findings of the top 10 film villains and of the top 10 film heroes. RESULTS: Six (60%) of the all-time top 10 American film villains have dermatologic findings, including cosmetically significant alopecia (30%), periorbital hyperpigmentation (30%), deep rhytides on the face (20%), multiple facial scars (20%), verruca vulgaris on the face (20%), and rhinophyma (10%). The top 10 villains have a higher incidence of significant dermatologic findings than the top 10 heroes (60% vs 0%; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Dermatologic findings of the all-time top 10 American villains are used in film to highlight the dichotomy of good and evil, which may foster a tendency toward prejudice in our society directed at those with skin disease.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020752835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020752835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1001/jamadermatol.2016.5979

DO - 10.1001/jamadermatol.2016.5979

M3 - Article

VL - 153

SP - 559

EP - 564

JO - JAMA Dermatology

JF - JAMA Dermatology

SN - 2168-6068

IS - 6

ER -