Designs conducive to the use of efficient strategies

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies on the widespread inefficient use of complex computer applications have suggested that users need to learn efficient strategies in addition to learning how to use tools. This paper argues that our growing understanding of strategic knowledge can be used to guide designers develop systems which are conducive to the use of efficient strategies. The paper first describes ten general strategies which appear to be useful across three computer application domains. Next, the paper discusses the functionalities required to execute the ten strategies, and what makes them conducive to strategy use. An analysis of six major computer applications in three domains reveals that these functionalities are not consistently offered, and how their absence directly affects the performance of complex tasks. The analysis leads to questions related to the generality of the results, the problem of featurism, and how strategy-conducive systems could facilitate the transfer of knowledge across applications. The paper concludes by briefly describing how we intend to use the strategy framework to develop analysis methods for designers and trainers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, United States
PublisherACM
Pages338-345
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques (DIS 2000) - New York, NY, USA
Duration: Aug 17 2000Aug 19 2000

Other

OtherProceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques (DIS 2000)
CityNew York, NY, USA
Period8/17/008/19/00

Fingerprint

Computer applications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering

Cite this

Bhavnani, S. (2000). Designs conducive to the use of efficient strategies. In Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS (pp. 338-345). New York, NY, United States: ACM.

Designs conducive to the use of efficient strategies. / Bhavnani, Suresh.

Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS. New York, NY, United States : ACM, 2000. p. 338-345.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Bhavnani, S 2000, Designs conducive to the use of efficient strategies. in Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS. ACM, New York, NY, United States, pp. 338-345, Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques (DIS 2000), New York, NY, USA, 8/17/00.
Bhavnani S. Designs conducive to the use of efficient strategies. In Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS. New York, NY, United States: ACM. 2000. p. 338-345
Bhavnani, Suresh. / Designs conducive to the use of efficient strategies. Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, DIS. New York, NY, United States : ACM, 2000. pp. 338-345
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