Development and analysis of a small animal model simulating the human postburn hypermetabolic response

David Herndon, Douglas W. Wilmore, Arthur D. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

151 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Growing guinea pigs and mature rats are good models of the human metabolic response to thermal injury demonstrating a dose-response relationship between burn size and metabolic rate, an elevation in metabolic rate related to the stage of convalescence and hypermetabolism that may be altered but not abated by external heating. A 50% total body surface burn must be produced before reliable elevations in metabolic rate are observed. The mature rat is the best of the three animal models and is suitable for evaluation of the mediators and modulators of the hypermetabolic response to thermal injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)394-403
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1978
Externally publishedYes

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Animal Models
Hot Temperature
Wounds and Injuries
Heating
Guinea Pigs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Development and analysis of a small animal model simulating the human postburn hypermetabolic response. / Herndon, David; Wilmore, Douglas W.; Mason, Arthur D.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 25, No. 5, 1978, p. 394-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Herndon, David ; Wilmore, Douglas W. ; Mason, Arthur D. / Development and analysis of a small animal model simulating the human postburn hypermetabolic response. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 1978 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 394-403.
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