Development and Feasibility of a Culturally Sensitive Cooking and Physical Activity Program Designed for Obese Hispanic Families

Rhea Li, Margaret Raber, Luz Mejia, Marite Domenech, Anna Brewster, Maria Swartz, Larkin Strong, Joya Chandra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether a 10-week cooking and physical activity pilot intervention could be delivered in a health care setting. Development and feasibility of the program with a small sample size are explored. Methods: The MUNDO (Moviéndonos hacia Una Nutrición Divertida y Óptima) program was delivered weekly at a local primary care clinic. The curriculum included culturally sensitive cooking demonstrations, tastings, and organized physical activity sessions for children and their parents. Questionnaires and measurements were completed at baseline and completion of the study. Outcomes were feasibility, anthropometrics, and behavior change. Results: Four families were recruited, and 3 families attended 74% of the sessions. No significant changes in outcomes were reported. Families provided positive feedback about most aspects of the program. Conclusions: Future research is needed to understand how delivery of MUNDO could be optimized, within and beyond a clinic setting. Low-cost meal planning and cultural sensitivity of this program are unique features of MUNDO, which suggest that a larger trial with a greater number of participants and more rigorous recruitment would be warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-93
Number of pages8
JournalInfant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 21 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cooking
Hispanic Americans
physical activity
cooking
cooking instruction
meal planning
Exercise
behavior change
curriculum
health services
Program Development
questionnaires
Curriculum
Sample Size
Meals
Primary Health Care
Parents
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
sampling

Keywords

  • cooking
  • Hispanic
  • nutrition education
  • obese
  • parents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Development and Feasibility of a Culturally Sensitive Cooking and Physical Activity Program Designed for Obese Hispanic Families. / Li, Rhea; Raber, Margaret; Mejia, Luz; Domenech, Marite; Brewster, Anna; Swartz, Maria; Strong, Larkin; Chandra, Joya.

In: Infant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition, Vol. 7, No. 2, 21.04.2015, p. 86-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Li, Rhea ; Raber, Margaret ; Mejia, Luz ; Domenech, Marite ; Brewster, Anna ; Swartz, Maria ; Strong, Larkin ; Chandra, Joya. / Development and Feasibility of a Culturally Sensitive Cooking and Physical Activity Program Designed for Obese Hispanic Families. In: Infant, Child, and Adolescent Nutrition. 2015 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 86-93.
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