Diagnosis of neonatal enterovirus infection by polymerase chain reaction

Mark J. Abzug, Michael Loeffelholz, Harley A. Rotbart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 5-hour colorimetric polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was more sensitive than viral culture in identifying viral infection in initial serum (13/16 vs 5/16; p = 0.008) and urine (10/16 vs 5/16; p = 0.2) specimens from 16 enterovirus- infected newborn infants, and remained more sensitive throughout their illnesses. Combined sensitivity of serum and urine PCR was 14 of 16 (88%). Results of all acute-phase PCR assays of serum and urine from four neonates with cultures negative for enterovirus were also negative. PCR assay of serum and urine facilitates rapid, accurate diagnosis of neonatal enterovirus infections. (J PEDIATR 1995;126:447-50).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-450
Number of pages4
JournalThe Journal of pediatrics
Volume126
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Enterovirus Infections
Urine
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Enterovirus
Serum
Newborn Infant
Virus Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Diagnosis of neonatal enterovirus infection by polymerase chain reaction. / Abzug, Mark J.; Loeffelholz, Michael; Rotbart, Harley A.

In: The Journal of pediatrics, Vol. 126, No. 3, 1995, p. 447-450.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abzug, Mark J. ; Loeffelholz, Michael ; Rotbart, Harley A. / Diagnosis of neonatal enterovirus infection by polymerase chain reaction. In: The Journal of pediatrics. 1995 ; Vol. 126, No. 3. pp. 447-450.
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