Differential effects of nebivolol and metoprolol on arterial stiffness, circulating progenitor cells, and oxidative stress

Salim S. Hayek, Joseph C. Poole, Robert Neuman, Alanna A. Morris, Mohamed Khayata, Nino Kavtaradze, Matthew L. Topel, Jose G. Binongo, Qunna Li, Dean P. Jones, Edmund K. Waller, Arshed A. Quyyumi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Unlike traditional beta receptor antagonists, nebivolol activates nitric oxide. We hypothesized that therapy with nebivolol compared with metoprolol would improve arterial stiffness, increase levels of circulating progenitor cells (PC), and decrease oxidative stress (OS). In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, 30 hypertensive subjects received either once daily nebivolol or metoprolol succinate for 3 months each. Pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were measured using tonometry. Flow cytometry was used to measure circulating PC. OS was measured as plasma aminothiols. Measurements were performed at baseline, and repeated at 3 and 6 months. No significant differences were present between the levels of OS, arterial stiffness, and PC numbers during treatment with metoprolol compared with nebivolol. In subgroup analyses of beta-blocker naïve subjects (n = 19), nebivolol reduced pulse wave velocity significantly compared with metoprolol (-1.4 ± 1.9 vs. -0.1 ± 2.2; P =.005). Both nebivolol and metoprolol increased circulating levels of CD34+/CD133 + PC similarly (P =.05), suggesting improved regenerative capacity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)206-213
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Society of Hypertension
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • aminothiols
  • beta blocker
  • CD133
  • CD34
  • Pulse wave velocity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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