Differential induction of interleukin-10 and interleukin-12 in dendritic cells by microbial Toll-like receptor activators and skewing of T-cell cytokine profiles

Hai Qi, Timothy L. Denning, Lynn Soong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

101 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) discriminate different microbial pathogens and induce T-cell responses of appropriate effector phenotypes accordingly. Microbial recognition and differentiation are mediated in part by pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), whereas the development of T-cell effector functions is critically dependent on DC-derived cytokines such as interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-10. However, it is not entirely clear to what extent various microbial TLR activators could induce different functional states of DCs that favor different T-cell effector phenotypes. Toward a better understanding of this issue, we examined IL-10 and IL-12 production and T-cell-polarizing potentials of murine bone marrow-derived DCs after stimulation by three microbial TLR activators, namely, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), peptidoglycan (PGN), and zymosan. We found that the three stimuli induced drastically different profiles of IL-10 and IL-12 production in DCs. Further, these stimuli differentially conditioned CD40-dependent IL-10 and IL-12 production by DCs. Finally, LPS-, PGN-, and zymosan-stimulated DCs primed distinct T-cell cytokine profiles. Our results support the notion that microbe-specific information sensed through different TLRs by DCs is linked to differential Th priming through DC-derived cytokines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3337-3342
Number of pages6
JournalInfection and Immunity
Volume71
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

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Toll-Like Receptors
Interleukin-12
Interleukin-10
Dendritic Cells
Cytokines
T-Lymphocytes
Zymosan
Peptidoglycan
Lipopolysaccharides
Phenotype
Pattern Recognition Receptors
Bone Marrow

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Differential induction of interleukin-10 and interleukin-12 in dendritic cells by microbial Toll-like receptor activators and skewing of T-cell cytokine profiles. / Qi, Hai; Denning, Timothy L.; Soong, Lynn.

In: Infection and Immunity, Vol. 71, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 3337-3342.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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