Differential influence of local anesthetic upon two models of experimentally induced peripheral mononeuropathy in the rat

Patrick M. Dougherty, Christopher J. Garrison, Susan M. Carlton

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    72 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Neuropathic pain remains a major complication of various forms of injury to peripheral nerves in humans. Recently, 2 models of peripheral mononeuropathy in the rat have been described which closely resemble the human condition. Bennett and Xie described one model induced by the placement of 4 loose ligatures around the entire sciatic nerve; Seltzer et al. have described a second model produced by the placement of a tight ligature around one-third to one-half of the sciatic nerve. It is the purpose of this work to compare the effect of these injuries on the time course and magnitude of hyperalgesia as measured by paw withdrawal latency to a radiant heat stimulus. In addition, to evaluate the hypothesis that neuropathic pain develops as a result of injury-associated discharges, some injuries were induced following anesthesia of the sciatic nerve. Our results show that the partial constriction neuropathy (PCN) described by Bennett and Xie develops in a faster time frame than that produced by the tight ligature, or partial transection neuropathy (PTN), described by Seltzer and co-workers. In addition, the PCN shows a reduction in both the duration and magnitude of behavioral hyperalgesia obtained for those animals in which local anesthetic (lidocaine) was applied to the sciatic nerve, while the PTN does not show this sensitivity. The data suggest that injury-related discharge is one important factor contributing to the generation of hyperalgesia in the PCN model. The mechanism(s) responsible for the generation of hyperalgesia in the early stages of the PTN model are not lidocaine-sensitive. The data are discussed in reference to the previously reported differences in these models of hyperalgesia and the involvement of central changes.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)109-115
    Number of pages7
    JournalBrain Research
    Volume570
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 20 1992

    Fingerprint

    Mononeuropathies
    Hyperalgesia
    Local Anesthetics
    Sciatic Nerve
    Constriction
    Ligation
    Wounds and Injuries
    Neuralgia
    Lidocaine
    Peripheral Nerve Injuries
    Anesthesia
    Hot Temperature

    Keywords

    • Constriction
    • Hyperalgesia
    • Lidocaine
    • Sciatic nerve
    • Transection

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Developmental Biology
    • Molecular Biology
    • Clinical Neurology
    • Neuroscience(all)

    Cite this

    Differential influence of local anesthetic upon two models of experimentally induced peripheral mononeuropathy in the rat. / Dougherty, Patrick M.; Garrison, Christopher J.; Carlton, Susan M.

    In: Brain Research, Vol. 570, No. 1-2, 20.01.1992, p. 109-115.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Dougherty, Patrick M. ; Garrison, Christopher J. ; Carlton, Susan M. / Differential influence of local anesthetic upon two models of experimentally induced peripheral mononeuropathy in the rat. In: Brain Research. 1992 ; Vol. 570, No. 1-2. pp. 109-115.
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