Diffusion of nitrous oxide into the pleural cavity

S. Kaur, Joaquin Cortiella, C. A. Vacanti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We postulated that nitrous oxide transfer into the pleural cavity can occur by diffusion from the alveoli, independent of vascular transport. Under general anaesthesia, six sheep were studied in two phases, a control and an experimental phase. The sheep were anaesthetized, intubated, and received positive pressure mechanical ventilation. A catheter was placed in the right pleural cavity and 150 ml air injected. The animals were ventilated with 100% oxygen. The inspired gas was changed to a mixture of 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen, and the rate of increase of nitrous oxide concentration in the pleural space was measured. The animals were then ventilated with 100% oxygen and then killed by exsanguination while ventilation was continued. The inspired mixture was changed to 50% nitrous oxide and 50% oxygen and the rate of increase in nitrous oxide concentration was measured in the pleural space again. During venitilation with nitrous oxide in the living animals, the concentration of nitrous oxide in the pleural cavity increased rapidly and decreased to zero during ventilation with 100% oxygen. During ventilation without circulation, the rate of increase in the concentration of nitrous oxide in the pleural cavity was the same as in the control phase. This suggests that nitrous oxide enters the pleural space by diffusion, rather than by vascular delivery. This mechanism may explain the rapid increase in the volume of pneumothorax if nitrous oxide is given in the inspired gas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)894-896
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Journal of Anaesthesia
Volume87
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pleural Cavity
Nitrous Oxide
Oxygen
Ventilation
Blood Vessels
Sheep
Gases
Exsanguination
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Pneumothorax
Artificial Respiration
General Anesthesia
Catheters
Air

Keywords

  • Anaesthetics gases, nitrous oxide
  • Lung, pneumothorax

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Diffusion of nitrous oxide into the pleural cavity. / Kaur, S.; Cortiella, Joaquin; Vacanti, C. A.

In: British Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol. 87, No. 6, 2001, p. 894-896.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaur, S. ; Cortiella, Joaquin ; Vacanti, C. A. / Diffusion of nitrous oxide into the pleural cavity. In: British Journal of Anaesthesia. 2001 ; Vol. 87, No. 6. pp. 894-896.
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