Direct disclosure by radiologists of imaging findings to patients

A survey of radiologists and medical staff members

Melvyn H. Schreiber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. A previous survey revealed that patients prefer to hear the results of imaging examinations from radiologists at the time of the procedure rather than be informed later by the referring physician. This study was performed to learn, by means of questionnaires, the attitudes of members of medical staff and of radiologists. SUBJECTS AND METHODS. Questionnaires were sent to members of the medical staff at my institution and to private and academic radiologists throughout the country. Respondents were presented with this statement: 'If an adult patient who knows why a radio logic examination is being performed and what is being sought asks to know the results from the radiologist, the radiologist should answer truthfully (and immediately contact the refer ring physician with the results and the fact that the patient has been informed).' Five alternatives were presented: 1 = strongly agree, 2 = agree, 3 = neutral, 4 = disagree, and 5 = strongly disagree. Results were tabulated by department in the first instance and by state and character of practice in the second. The sum of the replies in each area was divided by the number replying to obtain a mean figure. RESULTS. The mean figure for members of medical staff was 2.35, which was on the agree side of neutral, indicating at least neutrality, leaning toward agreement, on the subject. The overall mean figure of 2.18 for radiologists indicates substantial agreement with the stated proposition. CONCLUSION. This study suggests that radiologists and referring physicians alike tend to support the proposition that, if asked, radiologists should disclose the results of imaging studies to patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1091-1093
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume167
Issue number5
StatePublished - Nov 1996

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Medical Staff
Disclosure
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires
Radiologists
Radio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Direct disclosure by radiologists of imaging findings to patients : A survey of radiologists and medical staff members. / Schreiber, Melvyn H.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 167, No. 5, 11.1996, p. 1091-1093.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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