Direct measurement of laser fluence distribution and optoacoustic imaging in heterogeneous tissues

Alexander A. Oraevsky, Steven L. Jacques, Rinat Esenaliev, Frank K. Tittel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Determination of laser light distribution in tissues is an important aspect of any laser treatment of living tissues. It is especially essential for clinical laser procedures where profile of light distribution changes during irradiation and requires adjustments of laser conditions. Time- resolved stress detection (TRSD) technique is developed for the monitoring of light distribution in laser irradiated biological tissues, and for the measurement of tissue optical properties. The z-axial profile of a transient stress generated in tissue under confined stress conditions of irradiation corresponds to z-axial distribution of absorbed laser energy in the irradiated volume. The shapes and amplitudes of stress transients induced in layered biological tissues carry information about absorption and scattering properties in each tissue layer. TRSD technique does not require any special preparations, such as tissue slicing, to determine differences in optical properties of layered tissue. The temporal profile of the acoustic signal formed by laser heating can be detected from tissue front or rear surfaces. These two options provide necessary flexibility for an investigator to measure various tissues in vivo. We present time-resolved measurements of acoustic transients induced in heterogeneous phantom tissues by nanosecond laser pulses. Results indicate a capability of TRSD technique to resolve differently absorbing tissue layers with 10 micrometers resolution. Sensitivity of this technique, its advantages and limitations are discussed. Capability of this technique to measure optical properties in layered tissues is defined by a combination of three factors: Absorption coefficient, depth of certain layer and its thickness. Thickness of tissue layers with different optical properties can be measured with about 1-micrometers precision. Monte-Carlo simulations of light propagation in layered tissues yielded a good agreement with experimental results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLaser Interaction with Hard and Soft Tissue II
PublisherSPIE
Pages37-46
Number of pages10
Volume2323
ISBN (Electronic)9780819416568
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 18 1995
Externally publishedYes
EventLaser Interaction with Hard and Soft Tissue II 1994 - Lille, France
Duration: Sep 6 1994Sep 10 1994

Other

OtherLaser Interaction with Hard and Soft Tissue II 1994
CountryFrance
CityLille
Period9/6/949/10/94

Fingerprint

Photoacoustic effect
fluence
Imaging
Tissue
Laser
Imaging techniques
Lasers
Optical Properties
lasers
Biological Tissue
Irradiation
Acoustics
Optical properties
optical properties
Slicing
Absorption Coefficient
Phantom
Absorbing
Heating
micrometers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Oraevsky, A. A., Jacques, S. L., Esenaliev, R., & Tittel, F. K. (1995). Direct measurement of laser fluence distribution and optoacoustic imaging in heterogeneous tissues. In Laser Interaction with Hard and Soft Tissue II (Vol. 2323, pp. 37-46). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.199215

Direct measurement of laser fluence distribution and optoacoustic imaging in heterogeneous tissues. / Oraevsky, Alexander A.; Jacques, Steven L.; Esenaliev, Rinat; Tittel, Frank K.

Laser Interaction with Hard and Soft Tissue II. Vol. 2323 SPIE, 1995. p. 37-46.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Oraevsky, AA, Jacques, SL, Esenaliev, R & Tittel, FK 1995, Direct measurement of laser fluence distribution and optoacoustic imaging in heterogeneous tissues. in Laser Interaction with Hard and Soft Tissue II. vol. 2323, SPIE, pp. 37-46, Laser Interaction with Hard and Soft Tissue II 1994, Lille, France, 9/6/94. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.199215
Oraevsky AA, Jacques SL, Esenaliev R, Tittel FK. Direct measurement of laser fluence distribution and optoacoustic imaging in heterogeneous tissues. In Laser Interaction with Hard and Soft Tissue II. Vol. 2323. SPIE. 1995. p. 37-46 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.199215
Oraevsky, Alexander A. ; Jacques, Steven L. ; Esenaliev, Rinat ; Tittel, Frank K. / Direct measurement of laser fluence distribution and optoacoustic imaging in heterogeneous tissues. Laser Interaction with Hard and Soft Tissue II. Vol. 2323 SPIE, 1995. pp. 37-46
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