Disc degeneration: A human cadaveric study correlating magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative discomanometry

Edward Southern, Mark A. Fye, Manohar M. Panjabi, Tushar Ch Patel, Jacek Cholewicki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Design. This human cadaveric study evaluated disc degeneration of the lumbar spine using magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative discomanometry. Objective. To determine if a correlation exists between magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative discomanometry in determining disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Summary of Background Data. Several studies analyzing disc degeneration of the lumbar spine have compared magnetic resonance imaging with discography and discomanometry. The reported results are conflicting. No studies exist that compare magnetic resonance imaging and quantitative discomanometry in assessing the disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Methods. Three fresh human cadaveric thoracolumbar spine specimens (two T11-S1 and one L1-S1) that included a total of 19 discs were used. Spines were scanned with magnetic resonance imaging, and the scans were read by a neuroradiologist. Using the quantitative discomanometry technique, discs were injected with normal saline, and pressure-volume curves were collected and quantified with six parameters: intrinsic pressure, leakage pressure, initial slope, slope from 0.0 to 0.1 mL, maximum pressure, and volume at maximum pressure. Data analysis was performed using Spearman's Rank Correlation (Rho) statistic. Results. Based on the results from 19 discs, an overall good correlation between magnetic resonance imaging scores and the six quantitative discomanometry parameters was demonstrated. With exception of the volume at maximum pressure, correlation coefficients ranged between 0.61 to 0.78 with a P < 0.05. Conclusions. Magnetic resonance imaging scores and quantitative discomanometry parameters correlated well in the assessment of disc degeneration of the lumbar spine. Quantitative discomanometry may be an important technique for evaluating early disc degeneration, especially tears of the anular fibers, which may be missed on magnetic resonance imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2171-2175
Number of pages5
JournalSpine
Volume25
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Disc degeneration
  • Discography
  • Discomanometry
  • Internal disc disruption
  • Magnetic resonance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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