Documented Rocky Mountain spotted fever in wintertime

J. V. Lange, David Walker, T. B. Wester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is the most severe rickettsial disease of man in North America and is generally considered to be a seasonal disease. The overwhelming majority of cases occur between the months of April and October. This mostly warm-weather period also happens to be the time of maximum activity of the ixodid ticks that serve as both reservoir and vector for the disease. We report a case of RMSF during a prolonged cold winter period in February 1981 in North Carolina. This case is interesting not only because of its temporal occurrence but also because the etiologic agent was isolated and there was no tick bite history associated with it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2403-2404
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume247
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

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Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
Disease Reservoirs
Tick Bites
Disease Vectors
Weather
Ticks
North America

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Documented Rocky Mountain spotted fever in wintertime. / Lange, J. V.; Walker, David; Wester, T. B.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 247, No. 17, 1982, p. 2403-2404.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lange, J. V. ; Walker, David ; Wester, T. B. / Documented Rocky Mountain spotted fever in wintertime. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1982 ; Vol. 247, No. 17. pp. 2403-2404.
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