Does glutamine supplementation increase radioresistance in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix?

Joseph T. Santoso, Joseph A. Lucci, Robert L. Coleman, Sandra Hatch, Ping Wong, David Miller, J. Michael Mathis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Glutamine is proposed to protect bowel from radiation. However, glutamine may decrease cancer's radiosensitivity. We evaluate glutamine's effect on the growth rate and radiosensitivity of two cervical carcinoma cell lines in vitro. Methods. HeLa and CaSki cells were seeded at 3000 cells/well in glutamine-free medium. An increasing amount of glutamine (0.4, 10, and 20 mM) was added to the respective plates, incubated, and irradiated with a single fraction of 0.5, 1, 3, and 6 Gy. Using a growth inhibition assay and photometric analysis, the viable cells were counted on day 8. Cell counts represent a mean ± standard deviation from six experiments and are expressed in 103 cells. Analysis of variance was performed. Results. In nonirradiated HeLa plates, absence of glutamine results in 5.7 ± 1.2 cells/well. Addition of glutamine at 0.4, 10, and 20 mM to nonirradiated cells significantly (P < 0.0001) increased growth to 79.1 ± 10.0, 122.5 ± 9.0, and 114.3 ± 13.9 cells/well, respectively. In culture plates irradiated with 6 Gy, HeLa cells supplemented with 0.4, 10, and 20 mM of glutamine showed lower cell counts (P < 0.008). A similar significant growth suppression at 6 Gy in comparison to 0.5, 1, and 3 Gy was observed (P < 0.01). CaSki cells showed similar patterns. Conclusions. Growth of HeLa and CaSki cells in vitro requires a minimum of 0.4 mM of glutamine in the medium. Supraphysiologic glutamine concentration does not increase tumor growth or radioresistance. Glutamine should be evaluated further as a potential bowel radioprotector.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)359-363
Number of pages5
JournalGynecologic Oncology
Volume71
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1998

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Glutamine
Cervix Uteri
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Growth
HeLa Cells
Radiation Tolerance
Cell Count
Neoplasms
Analysis of Variance
Radiation
Carcinoma
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Santoso, J. T., Lucci, J. A., Coleman, R. L., Hatch, S., Wong, P., Miller, D., & Mathis, J. M. (1998). Does glutamine supplementation increase radioresistance in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix? Gynecologic Oncology, 71(3), 359-363. https://doi.org/10.1006/gyno.1998.5175

Does glutamine supplementation increase radioresistance in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix? / Santoso, Joseph T.; Lucci, Joseph A.; Coleman, Robert L.; Hatch, Sandra; Wong, Ping; Miller, David; Mathis, J. Michael.

In: Gynecologic Oncology, Vol. 71, No. 3, 12.1998, p. 359-363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Santoso, JT, Lucci, JA, Coleman, RL, Hatch, S, Wong, P, Miller, D & Mathis, JM 1998, 'Does glutamine supplementation increase radioresistance in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix?', Gynecologic Oncology, vol. 71, no. 3, pp. 359-363. https://doi.org/10.1006/gyno.1998.5175
Santoso, Joseph T. ; Lucci, Joseph A. ; Coleman, Robert L. ; Hatch, Sandra ; Wong, Ping ; Miller, David ; Mathis, J. Michael. / Does glutamine supplementation increase radioresistance in squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix?. In: Gynecologic Oncology. 1998 ; Vol. 71, No. 3. pp. 359-363.
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abstract = "Objective. Glutamine is proposed to protect bowel from radiation. However, glutamine may decrease cancer's radiosensitivity. We evaluate glutamine's effect on the growth rate and radiosensitivity of two cervical carcinoma cell lines in vitro. Methods. HeLa and CaSki cells were seeded at 3000 cells/well in glutamine-free medium. An increasing amount of glutamine (0.4, 10, and 20 mM) was added to the respective plates, incubated, and irradiated with a single fraction of 0.5, 1, 3, and 6 Gy. Using a growth inhibition assay and photometric analysis, the viable cells were counted on day 8. Cell counts represent a mean ± standard deviation from six experiments and are expressed in 103 cells. Analysis of variance was performed. Results. In nonirradiated HeLa plates, absence of glutamine results in 5.7 ± 1.2 cells/well. Addition of glutamine at 0.4, 10, and 20 mM to nonirradiated cells significantly (P < 0.0001) increased growth to 79.1 ± 10.0, 122.5 ± 9.0, and 114.3 ± 13.9 cells/well, respectively. In culture plates irradiated with 6 Gy, HeLa cells supplemented with 0.4, 10, and 20 mM of glutamine showed lower cell counts (P < 0.008). A similar significant growth suppression at 6 Gy in comparison to 0.5, 1, and 3 Gy was observed (P < 0.01). CaSki cells showed similar patterns. Conclusions. Growth of HeLa and CaSki cells in vitro requires a minimum of 0.4 mM of glutamine in the medium. Supraphysiologic glutamine concentration does not increase tumor growth or radioresistance. Glutamine should be evaluated further as a potential bowel radioprotector.",
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AU - Hatch, Sandra

AU - Wong, Ping

AU - Miller, David

AU - Mathis, J. Michael

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N2 - Objective. Glutamine is proposed to protect bowel from radiation. However, glutamine may decrease cancer's radiosensitivity. We evaluate glutamine's effect on the growth rate and radiosensitivity of two cervical carcinoma cell lines in vitro. Methods. HeLa and CaSki cells were seeded at 3000 cells/well in glutamine-free medium. An increasing amount of glutamine (0.4, 10, and 20 mM) was added to the respective plates, incubated, and irradiated with a single fraction of 0.5, 1, 3, and 6 Gy. Using a growth inhibition assay and photometric analysis, the viable cells were counted on day 8. Cell counts represent a mean ± standard deviation from six experiments and are expressed in 103 cells. Analysis of variance was performed. Results. In nonirradiated HeLa plates, absence of glutamine results in 5.7 ± 1.2 cells/well. Addition of glutamine at 0.4, 10, and 20 mM to nonirradiated cells significantly (P < 0.0001) increased growth to 79.1 ± 10.0, 122.5 ± 9.0, and 114.3 ± 13.9 cells/well, respectively. In culture plates irradiated with 6 Gy, HeLa cells supplemented with 0.4, 10, and 20 mM of glutamine showed lower cell counts (P < 0.008). A similar significant growth suppression at 6 Gy in comparison to 0.5, 1, and 3 Gy was observed (P < 0.01). CaSki cells showed similar patterns. Conclusions. Growth of HeLa and CaSki cells in vitro requires a minimum of 0.4 mM of glutamine in the medium. Supraphysiologic glutamine concentration does not increase tumor growth or radioresistance. Glutamine should be evaluated further as a potential bowel radioprotector.

AB - Objective. Glutamine is proposed to protect bowel from radiation. However, glutamine may decrease cancer's radiosensitivity. We evaluate glutamine's effect on the growth rate and radiosensitivity of two cervical carcinoma cell lines in vitro. Methods. HeLa and CaSki cells were seeded at 3000 cells/well in glutamine-free medium. An increasing amount of glutamine (0.4, 10, and 20 mM) was added to the respective plates, incubated, and irradiated with a single fraction of 0.5, 1, 3, and 6 Gy. Using a growth inhibition assay and photometric analysis, the viable cells were counted on day 8. Cell counts represent a mean ± standard deviation from six experiments and are expressed in 103 cells. Analysis of variance was performed. Results. In nonirradiated HeLa plates, absence of glutamine results in 5.7 ± 1.2 cells/well. Addition of glutamine at 0.4, 10, and 20 mM to nonirradiated cells significantly (P < 0.0001) increased growth to 79.1 ± 10.0, 122.5 ± 9.0, and 114.3 ± 13.9 cells/well, respectively. In culture plates irradiated with 6 Gy, HeLa cells supplemented with 0.4, 10, and 20 mM of glutamine showed lower cell counts (P < 0.008). A similar significant growth suppression at 6 Gy in comparison to 0.5, 1, and 3 Gy was observed (P < 0.01). CaSki cells showed similar patterns. Conclusions. Growth of HeLa and CaSki cells in vitro requires a minimum of 0.4 mM of glutamine in the medium. Supraphysiologic glutamine concentration does not increase tumor growth or radioresistance. Glutamine should be evaluated further as a potential bowel radioprotector.

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