Does peripartum infection increase the incidence of cerebral palsy in extremely low birthweight infants?

Maged Costantine, Helen Y. How, Kristin Coppage, Rose A. Maxwell, Baha M. Sibai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study was undertaken to determine the perinatal predictors of cerebral palsy in extremely low birthweight infants (<1000 g). Study Design: A case control study of infants with birthweight of less than 1000 g (19 with cerebral palsy and 38 controls) who survived beyond 18-22 months of corrected age was performed. Outcome variables included maternal demographics, obstetric complications, and neonatal outcome (gestational age at delivery, birthweight, Apgar scores, intrauterine growth restriction, respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage, and neonatal sepsis). Data analysis consisted of t tests, χ2, and analysis of variance when appropriate. Results: There were no significant differences between cerebral palsy and control groups with regard to mode of delivery, Apgar scores, preeclampsia, antenatal vaginal bleeding, or the use of magnesium sulfate. However, male gender (odds ratio 3.70; 95% CI 1.05-12.5), primigravid status (odds ratio 5.52; 95% CI 1.67-18.3), early neonatal sepsis (odds ratio 12.9; 95% CI 2.94-57.2) and chorioamnionitis, both clinical and histologic (odds ratio 3.71; 95% CI 1.16-11.9) were significantly associated with the development of cerebral palsy. The strong association between cerebral palsy and chorioamnionitis, as well as early neonatal sepsis, remain significant after adjustment for primigravid status and male gender. Conclusion: In extremely low birthweight infants, cerebral palsy was strongly associated with chorioamnionitis, early neonatal sepsis, male gender, and primigravid status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume196
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Peripartum Period
Cerebral Palsy
Chorioamnionitis
Incidence
Infection
Odds Ratio
Apgar Score
Magnesium Sulfate
Uterine Hemorrhage
Pre-Eclampsia
Gestational Age
Obstetrics
Case-Control Studies
Analysis of Variance
Mothers
Demography
Hemorrhage
Control Groups
Neonatal Sepsis
Growth

Keywords

  • cerebral palsy
  • chorioamnionitis
  • extremely low birthweight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Does peripartum infection increase the incidence of cerebral palsy in extremely low birthweight infants? / Costantine, Maged; How, Helen Y.; Coppage, Kristin; Maxwell, Rose A.; Sibai, Baha M.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 196, No. 5, 05.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Costantine, Maged ; How, Helen Y. ; Coppage, Kristin ; Maxwell, Rose A. ; Sibai, Baha M. / Does peripartum infection increase the incidence of cerebral palsy in extremely low birthweight infants?. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2007 ; Vol. 196, No. 5.
@article{b5236e9f638a4a22806f9a6cedb3e747,
title = "Does peripartum infection increase the incidence of cerebral palsy in extremely low birthweight infants?",
abstract = "Objectives: This study was undertaken to determine the perinatal predictors of cerebral palsy in extremely low birthweight infants (<1000 g). Study Design: A case control study of infants with birthweight of less than 1000 g (19 with cerebral palsy and 38 controls) who survived beyond 18-22 months of corrected age was performed. Outcome variables included maternal demographics, obstetric complications, and neonatal outcome (gestational age at delivery, birthweight, Apgar scores, intrauterine growth restriction, respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage, and neonatal sepsis). Data analysis consisted of t tests, χ2, and analysis of variance when appropriate. Results: There were no significant differences between cerebral palsy and control groups with regard to mode of delivery, Apgar scores, preeclampsia, antenatal vaginal bleeding, or the use of magnesium sulfate. However, male gender (odds ratio 3.70; 95{\%} CI 1.05-12.5), primigravid status (odds ratio 5.52; 95{\%} CI 1.67-18.3), early neonatal sepsis (odds ratio 12.9; 95{\%} CI 2.94-57.2) and chorioamnionitis, both clinical and histologic (odds ratio 3.71; 95{\%} CI 1.16-11.9) were significantly associated with the development of cerebral palsy. The strong association between cerebral palsy and chorioamnionitis, as well as early neonatal sepsis, remain significant after adjustment for primigravid status and male gender. Conclusion: In extremely low birthweight infants, cerebral palsy was strongly associated with chorioamnionitis, early neonatal sepsis, male gender, and primigravid status.",
keywords = "cerebral palsy, chorioamnionitis, extremely low birthweight",
author = "Maged Costantine and How, {Helen Y.} and Kristin Coppage and Maxwell, {Rose A.} and Sibai, {Baha M.}",
year = "2007",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajog.2007.01.009",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "196",
journal = "American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0002-9378",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does peripartum infection increase the incidence of cerebral palsy in extremely low birthweight infants?

AU - Costantine, Maged

AU - How, Helen Y.

AU - Coppage, Kristin

AU - Maxwell, Rose A.

AU - Sibai, Baha M.

PY - 2007/5

Y1 - 2007/5

N2 - Objectives: This study was undertaken to determine the perinatal predictors of cerebral palsy in extremely low birthweight infants (<1000 g). Study Design: A case control study of infants with birthweight of less than 1000 g (19 with cerebral palsy and 38 controls) who survived beyond 18-22 months of corrected age was performed. Outcome variables included maternal demographics, obstetric complications, and neonatal outcome (gestational age at delivery, birthweight, Apgar scores, intrauterine growth restriction, respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage, and neonatal sepsis). Data analysis consisted of t tests, χ2, and analysis of variance when appropriate. Results: There were no significant differences between cerebral palsy and control groups with regard to mode of delivery, Apgar scores, preeclampsia, antenatal vaginal bleeding, or the use of magnesium sulfate. However, male gender (odds ratio 3.70; 95% CI 1.05-12.5), primigravid status (odds ratio 5.52; 95% CI 1.67-18.3), early neonatal sepsis (odds ratio 12.9; 95% CI 2.94-57.2) and chorioamnionitis, both clinical and histologic (odds ratio 3.71; 95% CI 1.16-11.9) were significantly associated with the development of cerebral palsy. The strong association between cerebral palsy and chorioamnionitis, as well as early neonatal sepsis, remain significant after adjustment for primigravid status and male gender. Conclusion: In extremely low birthweight infants, cerebral palsy was strongly associated with chorioamnionitis, early neonatal sepsis, male gender, and primigravid status.

AB - Objectives: This study was undertaken to determine the perinatal predictors of cerebral palsy in extremely low birthweight infants (<1000 g). Study Design: A case control study of infants with birthweight of less than 1000 g (19 with cerebral palsy and 38 controls) who survived beyond 18-22 months of corrected age was performed. Outcome variables included maternal demographics, obstetric complications, and neonatal outcome (gestational age at delivery, birthweight, Apgar scores, intrauterine growth restriction, respiratory distress syndrome, intraventricular hemorrhage, and neonatal sepsis). Data analysis consisted of t tests, χ2, and analysis of variance when appropriate. Results: There were no significant differences between cerebral palsy and control groups with regard to mode of delivery, Apgar scores, preeclampsia, antenatal vaginal bleeding, or the use of magnesium sulfate. However, male gender (odds ratio 3.70; 95% CI 1.05-12.5), primigravid status (odds ratio 5.52; 95% CI 1.67-18.3), early neonatal sepsis (odds ratio 12.9; 95% CI 2.94-57.2) and chorioamnionitis, both clinical and histologic (odds ratio 3.71; 95% CI 1.16-11.9) were significantly associated with the development of cerebral palsy. The strong association between cerebral palsy and chorioamnionitis, as well as early neonatal sepsis, remain significant after adjustment for primigravid status and male gender. Conclusion: In extremely low birthweight infants, cerebral palsy was strongly associated with chorioamnionitis, early neonatal sepsis, male gender, and primigravid status.

KW - cerebral palsy

KW - chorioamnionitis

KW - extremely low birthweight

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34247204219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34247204219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajog.2007.01.009

DO - 10.1016/j.ajog.2007.01.009

M3 - Article

VL - 196

JO - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0002-9378

IS - 5

ER -