Does the ganglion of Ribes exist?

R. Shane Tubbs, David R. Kelly, Mohammadali Mohajel Shoja, Amir A. Khaki, Marios Loukas, Rita Humphrey, Gina D. Chua, Robert Lott, E. George Salter, W. Jerry Oakes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Some have included the ganglion of Ribes (Francois Ribes, 1765-1845), lying on the anterior communicating artery, as the most superior ganglion of the sympathetic nervous system. To verify the presence of this structure, the anterior communicating artery was harvested from 40 fresh adult cadavers and histological analysis and immunochemistry performed. Grossly and with magnification, no ganglion-like structures were found in or around the anterior communicating artery in any specimen. However, scattered neuronal cell bodies were found in the adventitia of the anterior communicating artery with histological immunochemical analysis. Based on the lack of vasoactive intestinal peptide staining and the positive reaction to tyrosine hydroxylase, these neurons are most likely sympathetic in nature. Based on our findings, a grossly visible ganglion of Ribes does not exist. However, neuronal cell bodies were found in the adventitia of the anterior communicating artery although the function of such cells remains speculative.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-201
Number of pages5
JournalFolia Neuropathologica
Volume44
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ribes
Ganglia
Arteries
Adventitia
Immunochemistry
Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide
Sympathetic Nervous System
Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase
Cadaver
Staining and Labeling
Neurons

Keywords

  • Anatomy
  • Autonomic nervous system
  • Brain
  • Vasculature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Tubbs, R. S., Kelly, D. R., Mohajel Shoja, M., Khaki, A. A., Loukas, M., Humphrey, R., ... Oakes, W. J. (2006). Does the ganglion of Ribes exist? Folia Neuropathologica, 44(3), 197-201.

Does the ganglion of Ribes exist? / Tubbs, R. Shane; Kelly, David R.; Mohajel Shoja, Mohammadali; Khaki, Amir A.; Loukas, Marios; Humphrey, Rita; Chua, Gina D.; Lott, Robert; Salter, E. George; Oakes, W. Jerry.

In: Folia Neuropathologica, Vol. 44, No. 3, 01.01.2006, p. 197-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tubbs, RS, Kelly, DR, Mohajel Shoja, M, Khaki, AA, Loukas, M, Humphrey, R, Chua, GD, Lott, R, Salter, EG & Oakes, WJ 2006, 'Does the ganglion of Ribes exist?', Folia Neuropathologica, vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 197-201.
Tubbs RS, Kelly DR, Mohajel Shoja M, Khaki AA, Loukas M, Humphrey R et al. Does the ganglion of Ribes exist? Folia Neuropathologica. 2006 Jan 1;44(3):197-201.
Tubbs, R. Shane ; Kelly, David R. ; Mohajel Shoja, Mohammadali ; Khaki, Amir A. ; Loukas, Marios ; Humphrey, Rita ; Chua, Gina D. ; Lott, Robert ; Salter, E. George ; Oakes, W. Jerry. / Does the ganglion of Ribes exist?. In: Folia Neuropathologica. 2006 ; Vol. 44, No. 3. pp. 197-201.
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