Early predictors of outcome in patients receiving hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

Adnan I. Qureshi, Jose I. Suarez, Anish Bhardwaj, Abutaher M. Yahia, Rafael J. Tamargo, John A. Ulatowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with a high incidence of permanent disability and death. For early identification of patients who are at risk for poor outcome, we determined the predictors of outcome in patients with symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Design: We retrospectively determined the prognostic value of clinical characteristics and computed tomographic scan both at admission and at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. Settings: Neurosciences critical care unit at a University hospital. Patients: A total of 70 consecutive patients who developed symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Intervention: Treatment with oral nimodipine, hypervolemic therapy, and hypertensive therapy. Angioplasty and intra-arterial papaverine were used in patients with vasospasm resistant to standard treatment. Measurements and Main Results: Poor outcome, defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale Score of 3-5 at 2 months or discharge, was observed in 32 (46%) patients. In the logistic regression analysis, a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of ≤11 (odds ratio, 11.0;95% confidence interval, 3.6-39.3) and hydrocephalus (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-18.2) at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy were significantly associated with poor outcome. Poor outcome was observed in 91% of the patients who had both a GCS score of ≤11 and hydrocephalus compared with 15% of patients with a GCS score of >11 and no hydrocephalus at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. A GCS score of ≤11 was also independently associated with length of intensive care unit stay (F ratio = 18.0; p = .0011) and hospital stay (F ratio = 9.2; p = .0034) after initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that outcome in patients with symptomatic vasospasm can be effectively predicted by routinely available information, including GCS score at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. This information can be used for selection and stratification of patients in future treatment studies of patients with symptomatic vasospasm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)824-829
Number of pages6
JournalCritical Care Medicine
Volume28
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Glasgow Coma Scale
Hydrocephalus
Therapeutics
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Glasgow Outcome Scale
Nimodipine
Papaverine
Critical Care
Neurosciences
Angioplasty
Patient Selection
Intensive Care Units
Length of Stay
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Incidence

Keywords

  • Angioplasty
  • Glasgow Coma Scale
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Hypervolemic therapy
  • Induced hypertension
  • Outcome
  • Papaverine
  • Prediction
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Symptomatic vasospasm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Early predictors of outcome in patients receiving hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. / Qureshi, Adnan I.; Suarez, Jose I.; Bhardwaj, Anish; Yahia, Abutaher M.; Tamargo, Rafael J.; Ulatowski, John A.

In: Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 28, No. 3, 2000, p. 824-829.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qureshi, Adnan I. ; Suarez, Jose I. ; Bhardwaj, Anish ; Yahia, Abutaher M. ; Tamargo, Rafael J. ; Ulatowski, John A. / Early predictors of outcome in patients receiving hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage. In: Critical Care Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 824-829.
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abstract = "Objective: Symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with a high incidence of permanent disability and death. For early identification of patients who are at risk for poor outcome, we determined the predictors of outcome in patients with symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Design: We retrospectively determined the prognostic value of clinical characteristics and computed tomographic scan both at admission and at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. Settings: Neurosciences critical care unit at a University hospital. Patients: A total of 70 consecutive patients who developed symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Intervention: Treatment with oral nimodipine, hypervolemic therapy, and hypertensive therapy. Angioplasty and intra-arterial papaverine were used in patients with vasospasm resistant to standard treatment. Measurements and Main Results: Poor outcome, defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale Score of 3-5 at 2 months or discharge, was observed in 32 (46{\%}) patients. In the logistic regression analysis, a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of ≤11 (odds ratio, 11.0;95{\%} confidence interval, 3.6-39.3) and hydrocephalus (odds ratio, 4.3; 95{\%} confidence interval, 1.2-18.2) at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy were significantly associated with poor outcome. Poor outcome was observed in 91{\%} of the patients who had both a GCS score of ≤11 and hydrocephalus compared with 15{\%} of patients with a GCS score of >11 and no hydrocephalus at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. A GCS score of ≤11 was also independently associated with length of intensive care unit stay (F ratio = 18.0; p = .0011) and hospital stay (F ratio = 9.2; p = .0034) after initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that outcome in patients with symptomatic vasospasm can be effectively predicted by routinely available information, including GCS score at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. This information can be used for selection and stratification of patients in future treatment studies of patients with symptomatic vasospasm.",
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T1 - Early predictors of outcome in patients receiving hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy for symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

AU - Qureshi, Adnan I.

AU - Suarez, Jose I.

AU - Bhardwaj, Anish

AU - Yahia, Abutaher M.

AU - Tamargo, Rafael J.

AU - Ulatowski, John A.

PY - 2000

Y1 - 2000

N2 - Objective: Symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with a high incidence of permanent disability and death. For early identification of patients who are at risk for poor outcome, we determined the predictors of outcome in patients with symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Design: We retrospectively determined the prognostic value of clinical characteristics and computed tomographic scan both at admission and at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. Settings: Neurosciences critical care unit at a University hospital. Patients: A total of 70 consecutive patients who developed symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Intervention: Treatment with oral nimodipine, hypervolemic therapy, and hypertensive therapy. Angioplasty and intra-arterial papaverine were used in patients with vasospasm resistant to standard treatment. Measurements and Main Results: Poor outcome, defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale Score of 3-5 at 2 months or discharge, was observed in 32 (46%) patients. In the logistic regression analysis, a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of ≤11 (odds ratio, 11.0;95% confidence interval, 3.6-39.3) and hydrocephalus (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-18.2) at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy were significantly associated with poor outcome. Poor outcome was observed in 91% of the patients who had both a GCS score of ≤11 and hydrocephalus compared with 15% of patients with a GCS score of >11 and no hydrocephalus at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. A GCS score of ≤11 was also independently associated with length of intensive care unit stay (F ratio = 18.0; p = .0011) and hospital stay (F ratio = 9.2; p = .0034) after initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that outcome in patients with symptomatic vasospasm can be effectively predicted by routinely available information, including GCS score at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. This information can be used for selection and stratification of patients in future treatment studies of patients with symptomatic vasospasm.

AB - Objective: Symptomatic vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with a high incidence of permanent disability and death. For early identification of patients who are at risk for poor outcome, we determined the predictors of outcome in patients with symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Design: We retrospectively determined the prognostic value of clinical characteristics and computed tomographic scan both at admission and at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. Settings: Neurosciences critical care unit at a University hospital. Patients: A total of 70 consecutive patients who developed symptomatic vasospasm after SAH. Intervention: Treatment with oral nimodipine, hypervolemic therapy, and hypertensive therapy. Angioplasty and intra-arterial papaverine were used in patients with vasospasm resistant to standard treatment. Measurements and Main Results: Poor outcome, defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale Score of 3-5 at 2 months or discharge, was observed in 32 (46%) patients. In the logistic regression analysis, a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of ≤11 (odds ratio, 11.0;95% confidence interval, 3.6-39.3) and hydrocephalus (odds ratio, 4.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-18.2) at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy were significantly associated with poor outcome. Poor outcome was observed in 91% of the patients who had both a GCS score of ≤11 and hydrocephalus compared with 15% of patients with a GCS score of >11 and no hydrocephalus at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. A GCS score of ≤11 was also independently associated with length of intensive care unit stay (F ratio = 18.0; p = .0011) and hospital stay (F ratio = 9.2; p = .0034) after initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that outcome in patients with symptomatic vasospasm can be effectively predicted by routinely available information, including GCS score at the time of initiation of hypervolemic and hypertensive therapy. This information can be used for selection and stratification of patients in future treatment studies of patients with symptomatic vasospasm.

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KW - Glasgow Coma Scale

KW - Hydrocephalus

KW - Hypervolemic therapy

KW - Induced hypertension

KW - Outcome

KW - Papaverine

KW - Prediction

KW - Subarachnoid hemorrhage

KW - Symptomatic vasospasm

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