Early Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients and Normal Volunteers: Comparative Mechanisms of Sequence Learning

Marc J. Mentis, V. Dhawan, Andrew Feigin, Dominique Delalot, Dennis Zgaljardic, Christine Edwards, David Eidelberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Early-stage nondemented Parkinson's disease (PD(es)) patients can learn short but not long sequences as well as controls. We have previously shown that to achieve normal performance, PD(es) patients activated the same right-sided cortical regions as controls plus the homologous left sided cortex and bilateral cerebellum. In this study, we evaluated two related hypotheses to explain the behavioral abnormalities and the increased bilateral brain activation observed in the PD(es) group. Hypothesis 1 proposed that PD(es) patients recruit regions from a normal bilateral network specialized for sequence learning that healthy controls would activate if performing difficult tasks. Thus, PD(es) patients can learn short sequences as well as controls. Hypothesis 2 proposed that information processing within the network in the PD(es) group is impaired. Thus, PD(es) patients cannot learn as difficult a sequence as controls. To test hypothesis 1, we increased task difficulty and statistical power in the control group and showed that the control and the PD(es) groups activated the same regions. To test hypothesis 2, we analyzed the equal performance data using two partial least squares (PLS) multivariate analyses. The task-PLS analysis showed that to perform equally with controls, the PD (es) group expressed the normal bilateral network more than the control group. The behavior-PLS analysis showed that the correlation between learning performance and regional activation was significantly different between the groups. We conclude that PD(es) patients have near normal learning if task difficulty is moderate because they can recruit additional regions from a normal bilateral network specialized for sequence learning. However, when a difficult task would normally require bilateral activation, PD(es) patients fail to learn because information processing within the network is impaired.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)246-258
Number of pages13
JournalHuman Brain Mapping
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Parkinson Disease
Healthy Volunteers
Learning
Least-Squares Analysis
Automatic Data Processing
Control Groups
Cerebellum
Multivariate Analysis
Brain

Keywords

  • Cerebellum
  • Cortex
  • Declarative
  • Human
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Positron emission tomography
  • Sequence learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Mentis, M. J., Dhawan, V., Feigin, A., Delalot, D., Zgaljardic, D., Edwards, C., & Eidelberg, D. (2003). Early Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients and Normal Volunteers: Comparative Mechanisms of Sequence Learning. Human Brain Mapping, 20(4), 246-258. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.10142

Early Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients and Normal Volunteers : Comparative Mechanisms of Sequence Learning. / Mentis, Marc J.; Dhawan, V.; Feigin, Andrew; Delalot, Dominique; Zgaljardic, Dennis; Edwards, Christine; Eidelberg, David.

In: Human Brain Mapping, Vol. 20, No. 4, 12.2003, p. 246-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mentis, MJ, Dhawan, V, Feigin, A, Delalot, D, Zgaljardic, D, Edwards, C & Eidelberg, D 2003, 'Early Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients and Normal Volunteers: Comparative Mechanisms of Sequence Learning', Human Brain Mapping, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 246-258. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.10142
Mentis, Marc J. ; Dhawan, V. ; Feigin, Andrew ; Delalot, Dominique ; Zgaljardic, Dennis ; Edwards, Christine ; Eidelberg, David. / Early Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients and Normal Volunteers : Comparative Mechanisms of Sequence Learning. In: Human Brain Mapping. 2003 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 246-258.
@article{dbf89ca1e26b4df0a191ef316843d7d4,
title = "Early Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients and Normal Volunteers: Comparative Mechanisms of Sequence Learning",
abstract = "Early-stage nondemented Parkinson's disease (PD(es)) patients can learn short but not long sequences as well as controls. We have previously shown that to achieve normal performance, PD(es) patients activated the same right-sided cortical regions as controls plus the homologous left sided cortex and bilateral cerebellum. In this study, we evaluated two related hypotheses to explain the behavioral abnormalities and the increased bilateral brain activation observed in the PD(es) group. Hypothesis 1 proposed that PD(es) patients recruit regions from a normal bilateral network specialized for sequence learning that healthy controls would activate if performing difficult tasks. Thus, PD(es) patients can learn short sequences as well as controls. Hypothesis 2 proposed that information processing within the network in the PD(es) group is impaired. Thus, PD(es) patients cannot learn as difficult a sequence as controls. To test hypothesis 1, we increased task difficulty and statistical power in the control group and showed that the control and the PD(es) groups activated the same regions. To test hypothesis 2, we analyzed the equal performance data using two partial least squares (PLS) multivariate analyses. The task-PLS analysis showed that to perform equally with controls, the PD (es) group expressed the normal bilateral network more than the control group. The behavior-PLS analysis showed that the correlation between learning performance and regional activation was significantly different between the groups. We conclude that PD(es) patients have near normal learning if task difficulty is moderate because they can recruit additional regions from a normal bilateral network specialized for sequence learning. However, when a difficult task would normally require bilateral activation, PD(es) patients fail to learn because information processing within the network is impaired.",
keywords = "Cerebellum, Cortex, Declarative, Human, Parkinson's disease, Positron emission tomography, Sequence learning",
author = "Mentis, {Marc J.} and V. Dhawan and Andrew Feigin and Dominique Delalot and Dennis Zgaljardic and Christine Edwards and David Eidelberg",
year = "2003",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1002/hbm.10142",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "246--258",
journal = "Human Brain Mapping",
issn = "1065-9471",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early Stage Parkinson's Disease Patients and Normal Volunteers

T2 - Comparative Mechanisms of Sequence Learning

AU - Mentis, Marc J.

AU - Dhawan, V.

AU - Feigin, Andrew

AU - Delalot, Dominique

AU - Zgaljardic, Dennis

AU - Edwards, Christine

AU - Eidelberg, David

PY - 2003/12

Y1 - 2003/12

N2 - Early-stage nondemented Parkinson's disease (PD(es)) patients can learn short but not long sequences as well as controls. We have previously shown that to achieve normal performance, PD(es) patients activated the same right-sided cortical regions as controls plus the homologous left sided cortex and bilateral cerebellum. In this study, we evaluated two related hypotheses to explain the behavioral abnormalities and the increased bilateral brain activation observed in the PD(es) group. Hypothesis 1 proposed that PD(es) patients recruit regions from a normal bilateral network specialized for sequence learning that healthy controls would activate if performing difficult tasks. Thus, PD(es) patients can learn short sequences as well as controls. Hypothesis 2 proposed that information processing within the network in the PD(es) group is impaired. Thus, PD(es) patients cannot learn as difficult a sequence as controls. To test hypothesis 1, we increased task difficulty and statistical power in the control group and showed that the control and the PD(es) groups activated the same regions. To test hypothesis 2, we analyzed the equal performance data using two partial least squares (PLS) multivariate analyses. The task-PLS analysis showed that to perform equally with controls, the PD (es) group expressed the normal bilateral network more than the control group. The behavior-PLS analysis showed that the correlation between learning performance and regional activation was significantly different between the groups. We conclude that PD(es) patients have near normal learning if task difficulty is moderate because they can recruit additional regions from a normal bilateral network specialized for sequence learning. However, when a difficult task would normally require bilateral activation, PD(es) patients fail to learn because information processing within the network is impaired.

AB - Early-stage nondemented Parkinson's disease (PD(es)) patients can learn short but not long sequences as well as controls. We have previously shown that to achieve normal performance, PD(es) patients activated the same right-sided cortical regions as controls plus the homologous left sided cortex and bilateral cerebellum. In this study, we evaluated two related hypotheses to explain the behavioral abnormalities and the increased bilateral brain activation observed in the PD(es) group. Hypothesis 1 proposed that PD(es) patients recruit regions from a normal bilateral network specialized for sequence learning that healthy controls would activate if performing difficult tasks. Thus, PD(es) patients can learn short sequences as well as controls. Hypothesis 2 proposed that information processing within the network in the PD(es) group is impaired. Thus, PD(es) patients cannot learn as difficult a sequence as controls. To test hypothesis 1, we increased task difficulty and statistical power in the control group and showed that the control and the PD(es) groups activated the same regions. To test hypothesis 2, we analyzed the equal performance data using two partial least squares (PLS) multivariate analyses. The task-PLS analysis showed that to perform equally with controls, the PD (es) group expressed the normal bilateral network more than the control group. The behavior-PLS analysis showed that the correlation between learning performance and regional activation was significantly different between the groups. We conclude that PD(es) patients have near normal learning if task difficulty is moderate because they can recruit additional regions from a normal bilateral network specialized for sequence learning. However, when a difficult task would normally require bilateral activation, PD(es) patients fail to learn because information processing within the network is impaired.

KW - Cerebellum

KW - Cortex

KW - Declarative

KW - Human

KW - Parkinson's disease

KW - Positron emission tomography

KW - Sequence learning

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0345257797&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0345257797&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/hbm.10142

DO - 10.1002/hbm.10142

M3 - Article

C2 - 14673808

AN - SCOPUS:0345257797

VL - 20

SP - 246

EP - 258

JO - Human Brain Mapping

JF - Human Brain Mapping

SN - 1065-9471

IS - 4

ER -