Eating Behaviors, Weight Bias, and Psychological Functioning in Multi-ethnic Low-income Adolescents

Rana Halabi Najjar, Eufemia Jacob, Lorraine Evangelista

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose The purposes of this study were to: 1) Describe the incidence of disordered eating, weight bias, body dissatisfaction, and psychological distress, 2) Examine the relationship between sociodemographic variables (gender, ethnicity, and income) and disordered eating, weight bias, body dissatisfaction, and psychological distress in a sample of low-income adolescents. Design and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 105 adolescents from low-income neighborhoods. Participants completed self-report questionnaires to assess eating behaviors, weight bias, body dissatisfaction, and psychological functioning. Height and weight were measured, and information on household income was collected. Results The participant's mean age was 16.31 (SD = 2.8) years, 66% female, 47% Hispanic, and 46% African American. The mean annual income was $17,018 (SD = 11,355). Twenty-eight percent self-reported having some form of disordered eating, and 15% reported an eating disorder. The group with eating disorder reported the highest levels of weight bias (M = 93.4, SD = 109.6), body dissatisfaction (M = 94.6, SD = 47.6), and psychological distress (M = 1.4, SD = 0.97). Conclusion This study found a high prevalence of eating disorders with eating disorder participants experiencing the highest levels of weight bias and psychological distress. Future studies are needed to identify and evaluate community and school-based interventions to minimize weight bias and disordered eating. Practice Implications Nurses are at the forefront of healthcare and should collaborate with educators, school counselors, administrators, coaches, parents, and students, to address weight bias and disordered eating in schools by implementing school-based curriculum and policies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-87
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Nursing
Volume38
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Feeding Behavior
Eating
Psychology
Weights and Measures
Body Weight
Administrative Personnel
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Curriculum
Self Report
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parents
Nurses
Students
Delivery of Health Care
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Incidence

Keywords

  • Disordered eating
  • Obesity
  • Weight bias

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics

Cite this

Eating Behaviors, Weight Bias, and Psychological Functioning in Multi-ethnic Low-income Adolescents. / Najjar, Rana Halabi; Jacob, Eufemia; Evangelista, Lorraine.

In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing, Vol. 38, 01.01.2018, p. 81-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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