Ebola (subtype Reston) virus among quarantined nonhuman primates recently imported from the Philippines to the United States

Pierre E. Rollin, R. Joel Williams, David S. Bressler, Stephen Pearson, Mark Cottingham, George Pucak, Anthony Sanchez, Sam G. Trappier, Robert L. Peters, Patricia W. Greer, Sherif Zaki, Thomas Demarcus, Katherine Hendricks, Mike Kelley, Diane Simpson, Thomas W. Geisbert, Peter B. Jahrling, C. J. Peters, Thomas G. Ksiazek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

111 Scopus citations

Abstract

In April 1996, laboratory testing of imported nonhuman primates (as mandated by quarantine regulations) identified 2 cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) infected with Ebola (subtype Reston) virus in a US-registered quarantine facility. The animals were part of a shipment of 100 nonhuman primates recently imported from the Philippines. Two additional infected animals, who were thought to be in the incubation phase, were identified among the remaining 48 animals in the affected quarantine room. The other 50 macaques, who had been held in a separate isolation room, remained asymptomatic, and none of these animals seroconverted during an extended quarantine period. Due to the rigorous routine safety precautions, the facility personnel had no unprotected exposures and remained asymptomatic, and no one seroconverted. The mandatory quarantine and laboratory testing requirements, put in place after the original Reston outbreak in 1989-1990, were effective for detecting and containing Ebola virus infection in newly imported nonhuman primates and minimizing potential human transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S108-S114
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume179
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Mar 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Rollin, P. E., Williams, R. J., Bressler, D. S., Pearson, S., Cottingham, M., Pucak, G., Sanchez, A., Trappier, S. G., Peters, R. L., Greer, P. W., Zaki, S., Demarcus, T., Hendricks, K., Kelley, M., Simpson, D., Geisbert, T. W., Jahrling, P. B., Peters, C. J., & Ksiazek, T. G. (1999). Ebola (subtype Reston) virus among quarantined nonhuman primates recently imported from the Philippines to the United States. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 179(SUPPL. 1), S108-S114.