Ecologic studies of vesicular stomatitis virus II. Results of experimental infection in panamanian wild animals

Robert B. Tesh, Pauline H. Peralta, Karl M. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tesh, R. B., P. H. Peralta and K. M. Johnson (Middle America Research Unit, Box 2011, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone). Ecologic studies of vesicular stomatitis virus. II. Results of experimental infection in Panamanian wild animals. Amer. J. Epid., 1970, 97: 216-224.-Effects of VSV inoculation in various wild vertebrates were studied. Most mammals were susceptible to VSV infection; adults had inapparent infections and subsequently developed high levels of neutralizing antibodies, while many young mammals developed encephalitic signs and died following VSV inoculation. Serologic response of birds was variable, depending upon the species. Attempts to isolate VSV from serial blood, throat and skin specimens from infected animals were largely unsuccessful. Clearance studies indicated that the virus was rapidly removed from blood, suggesting that the viremia associated with VSV infection was extremely transient. These results, plus epidemiologic observations of vesicular stosmatitis epizootics, imply that the natural source of VSV may be nonvertebrate, possibly a plant.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-224
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume91
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1970
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Vesicular Stomatitis
Wild Animals
Viruses
Infection
Panama Canal Zone
Mammals
Viremia
Pharynx
Neutralizing Antibodies
Birds
Vertebrates
Skin
Research

Keywords

  • Arbovirus
  • Experimental infection
  • Immune response
  • Neutralization tests
  • Neutralizing antibodies
  • Phlebolomus
  • Sandflies
  • Vesicular stomatitis virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Ecologic studies of vesicular stomatitis virus II. Results of experimental infection in panamanian wild animals. / Tesh, Robert B.; Peralta, Pauline H.; Johnson, Karl M.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 91, No. 2, 02.1970, p. 216-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tesh, Robert B. ; Peralta, Pauline H. ; Johnson, Karl M. / Ecologic studies of vesicular stomatitis virus II. Results of experimental infection in panamanian wild animals. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 1970 ; Vol. 91, No. 2. pp. 216-224.
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