Effect of a Remote Facilitator on Small-Group Problem Solving: Potential Uses of Two-Way Video Technology in Decentralized Medical Education

William J. Crump, Juanita W. Caskey, Barbara G. Ferrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: As more of medical education becomes decentralized to off-campus sites, the ability of campus faculty to monitor the development of student problem-solving skills becomes more limited. Purpose: This study addressed the acceptability of providing a remote facilitator by telephone or full-motion interactive video, as well as measuring the effect on group process in each of the three facilitator arrangements. Methods: Three groups of clerkship students were facilitated first on site, then by interactive video, then by telephone only. Results: Both off-site methods proved acceptable, but students felt that they increased their content knowledge more in on-site and video sessions. There were no differences in group interactions. In the on-site and telephone groups, the facilitators tended to be the predominant questioners; in the video group, the students asked more questions of the facilitator. Conclusions: In the sequence used, interactive video technology had the same or more positive effects on measured variables when compared to an on-site facilitator. Teaching and Learning in Medicine, 10(3), 172-177

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)172-177
Number of pages6
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume10
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1998

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Medical Education
small group
video
Telephone
Students
Technology
telephone
education
Group
student
Aptitude
Group Processes
group interaction
Teaching
Medicine
Learning
medicine
ability
learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

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Effect of a Remote Facilitator on Small-Group Problem Solving : Potential Uses of Two-Way Video Technology in Decentralized Medical Education. / Crump, William J.; Caskey, Juanita W.; Ferrell, Barbara G.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 10, No. 3, 1998, p. 172-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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