Effect of active vs. passive recovery on repeat suicide run time

James E. Graham, J. Douglas Boatwright, Martha J. Hunskor, Dan C. Howell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the difference between active and passive recovery methods during successive suicide runs by Division I women's collegiate basketball athletes (n = 14). Testing consisted of sprinting suicides on the basketball court using both traditional (short) and reverse-sequence (long) protocols. Two 90-second recovery methods were used, passive (standing still) and active (slow self-paced jogging). Although successive run time was reduced by a mean of 0.55 seconds after passive recovery relative to active, it did not reach significance (p = 0.09). Likewise, the difference between long and short line versions was nonsignificant (p = 0.41). Therefore, neither line sequence nor 90-second recovery technique appears to influence subsequent run time when performing 2 maximal-effort suicides.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)338-341
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Suicide
Basketball
Jogging
Athletes

Keywords

  • Anaerobic
  • Basketball
  • Interval training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Effect of active vs. passive recovery on repeat suicide run time. / Graham, James E.; Boatwright, J. Douglas; Hunskor, Martha J.; Howell, Dan C.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 17, No. 2, 05.2003, p. 338-341.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Graham, James E. ; Boatwright, J. Douglas ; Hunskor, Martha J. ; Howell, Dan C. / Effect of active vs. passive recovery on repeat suicide run time. In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2003 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 338-341.
@article{627e9f3abfb5460caac1cfefe4e557a3,
title = "Effect of active vs. passive recovery on repeat suicide run time",
abstract = "This study was conducted to evaluate the difference between active and passive recovery methods during successive suicide runs by Division I women's collegiate basketball athletes (n = 14). Testing consisted of sprinting suicides on the basketball court using both traditional (short) and reverse-sequence (long) protocols. Two 90-second recovery methods were used, passive (standing still) and active (slow self-paced jogging). Although successive run time was reduced by a mean of 0.55 seconds after passive recovery relative to active, it did not reach significance (p = 0.09). Likewise, the difference between long and short line versions was nonsignificant (p = 0.41). Therefore, neither line sequence nor 90-second recovery technique appears to influence subsequent run time when performing 2 maximal-effort suicides.",
keywords = "Anaerobic, Basketball, Interval training",
author = "Graham, {James E.} and Boatwright, {J. Douglas} and Hunskor, {Martha J.} and Howell, {Dan C.}",
year = "2003",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1519/1533-4287(2003)017<0338:EOAVPR>2.0.CO;2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "338--341",
journal = "Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research",
issn = "1064-8011",
publisher = "NSCA National Strength and Conditioning Association",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of active vs. passive recovery on repeat suicide run time

AU - Graham, James E.

AU - Boatwright, J. Douglas

AU - Hunskor, Martha J.

AU - Howell, Dan C.

PY - 2003/5

Y1 - 2003/5

N2 - This study was conducted to evaluate the difference between active and passive recovery methods during successive suicide runs by Division I women's collegiate basketball athletes (n = 14). Testing consisted of sprinting suicides on the basketball court using both traditional (short) and reverse-sequence (long) protocols. Two 90-second recovery methods were used, passive (standing still) and active (slow self-paced jogging). Although successive run time was reduced by a mean of 0.55 seconds after passive recovery relative to active, it did not reach significance (p = 0.09). Likewise, the difference between long and short line versions was nonsignificant (p = 0.41). Therefore, neither line sequence nor 90-second recovery technique appears to influence subsequent run time when performing 2 maximal-effort suicides.

AB - This study was conducted to evaluate the difference between active and passive recovery methods during successive suicide runs by Division I women's collegiate basketball athletes (n = 14). Testing consisted of sprinting suicides on the basketball court using both traditional (short) and reverse-sequence (long) protocols. Two 90-second recovery methods were used, passive (standing still) and active (slow self-paced jogging). Although successive run time was reduced by a mean of 0.55 seconds after passive recovery relative to active, it did not reach significance (p = 0.09). Likewise, the difference between long and short line versions was nonsignificant (p = 0.41). Therefore, neither line sequence nor 90-second recovery technique appears to influence subsequent run time when performing 2 maximal-effort suicides.

KW - Anaerobic

KW - Basketball

KW - Interval training

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037865535&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037865535&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1519/1533-4287(2003)017<0338:EOAVPR>2.0.CO;2

DO - 10.1519/1533-4287(2003)017<0338:EOAVPR>2.0.CO;2

M3 - Article

C2 - 12741874

AN - SCOPUS:0037865535

VL - 17

SP - 338

EP - 341

JO - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

JF - Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research

SN - 1064-8011

IS - 2

ER -