Effect of exogenous growth hormone and exercise on lean mass and muscle function in children with burns

Oscar Suman, Steve J. Thomas, Judy P. Wilkins, Ronald P. Mlcak, David Herndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that the administration of recombinant human growth hormone (rHGH) and exercise would increase lean body mass (LBM) and muscle strength in burned children to a greater extent than rHGH or exercise separately. Children, ages 7-17 yr, with >40% body surface area burned, were randomized into groups. One group (GHEX, n = 10) participated in a 12-wk in-hospital physical rehabilitation program supplemented with an exercise program and received 0.05 mg·kg-1·day-1 of rHGH. A second exercising group (SALEX, n = 13) received saline. A third group (GH, n = 10) received a similar dose of rHGH as GHEX and participated in a 12-wk, home-based physical rehabilitation program without exercise. The fourth group (Saline, n = 11) received saline and participated in a 12-wk, home-based physical rehabilitation program without exercise. The mean (±SE) percent change in lean body mass after 12 wk was not significantly different between GHEX (9.0 ± 2.1%), SALEX (5.4 ± 1.6%), and GH (5.8 ± 1.8%) groups (P = 0.33). However, the mean percent change in muscle strength was significantly greater in the GHEX (36.2 ± 5.4%) and SALEX (42.6 ± 10.0%) groups than in the GH (-7.4 ± 4.7%) or Saline (6.7 ± 4.4%) groups (P = 0.008). In summary, rHGH GHEX, SALEX, and GH alone produced similar improvements in LBM. However, muscle strength was only increased via exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2273-2281
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume94
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

Fingerprint

Burns
Human Growth Hormone
Growth Hormone
Exercise
Muscles
Muscle Strength
Rehabilitation
Body Surface Area

Keywords

  • Burned children
  • Rehabilitation
  • Thermal injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effect of exogenous growth hormone and exercise on lean mass and muscle function in children with burns. / Suman, Oscar; Thomas, Steve J.; Wilkins, Judy P.; Mlcak, Ronald P.; Herndon, David.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 94, No. 6, 01.06.2003, p. 2273-2281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Suman, Oscar ; Thomas, Steve J. ; Wilkins, Judy P. ; Mlcak, Ronald P. ; Herndon, David. / Effect of exogenous growth hormone and exercise on lean mass and muscle function in children with burns. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2003 ; Vol. 94, No. 6. pp. 2273-2281.
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