Effect of freezing plasma at -20°C for 2 weeks on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, dilute Russell viper venom time, activated protein c resistance, and d-dimer levels

Michelle Foshat, Stephanie Bates, Wendy Russo, Araceli Huerta, Kathleen Albright, Karen Giddings, Alexander Indrikovs, You Wen Qian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

To assess the impact of preanalytical variables of time and temperature on prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), dilute Russell viper venom time (DRVVT), activated protein C resistance (APCR), and d-dimer, samples from 23 healthy individuals and 18 patients having coagulopathy with known abnormal PT and aPTT were collected. Plasma from each individual was separately pooled and aliquoted; the first 2 aliquots were stored at room temperature then analyzed at 2 hours (baseline) and 4 hours postcollection. The remaining aliquots were stored at -20°C and thawed for analysis at 48 hours, 1, and 2 weeks. In both healthy participants and participants with coagulopathy, PT, aPTT, APCR, DRVVT, and D-dimer had no significant changes at 4 and 48 hours, and 1 and 2 weeks postcollection compared to baseline, or the changes were less than 10%. The results indicate PT, aPTT, DRVVT, APCR, and d-dimer can be stored for 2 weeks at -20°C without compromising clinical interpretation in both healthy individuals and individuals with coagulopathy. Increasing storage time will facilitate sample processing from off-site clinics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-47
Number of pages7
JournalClinical and Applied Thrombosis/Hemostasis
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 4 2015

Keywords

  • APCR
  • DRVVT
  • PT
  • aPTT
  • coagulation
  • d-dimer
  • preanalytical variables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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