Effect of functional gain on satisfaction with medical rehabilitation after stroke

Leigh R. Tooth, Kenneth Ottenbacher, Pamela M. Smith, Sandra B. Illig, Richard T. Linn, Vera A. Gonzales, Carl V. Granger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association between gain in motor and cognitive functional status with patient satisfaction 3-6 mo after rehabilitation discharge. Design: Patient satisfaction and changes in functional status were examined in 18,375 patients with stroke who received inpatient medical rehabilitation. Information was obtained from 144 hospitals and rehabilitation facilities contributing records to the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation and the National Follow-up Services. Results: Data analysis revealed significant (P < 0.05) differences in satisfaction responses based on whether information was collected from patient self-report or from a family member proxy, and the two subsets were analyzed separately. Logistic regression revealed the following significant predictors of satisfaction for data collected from stroke patients: cognitive and motor gain, rehospitalization, who the patient was living with at follow-up, age, and follow-up therapy. In the patient-reported data subset, compared with patients who showed improved cognitive or motor functional status, those with no change, respectively, had a 31% and 33% reduced risk of dissatisfaction. In addition, rehospitalized patients had a higher risk of dissatisfaction. For the proxy reported data subset, significant influences on satisfaction were health maintenance, rehospitalization, stroke type, ethnicity, cognitive FIM™ gain, length of stay, and follow-up therapy. Conclusions: Ratings of satisfaction with rehabilitation services were affected by change in functional status and whether the information was collected from patient rating or proxy response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)692-699
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume82
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2003

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Rehabilitation
Proxy
Stroke
Patient Satisfaction
Stroke Rehabilitation
Information Systems
Self Report
Inpatients
Length of Stay
Logistic Models
Health
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Brain Attack
  • Patient Preferences
  • Rehabilitation Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effect of functional gain on satisfaction with medical rehabilitation after stroke. / Tooth, Leigh R.; Ottenbacher, Kenneth; Smith, Pamela M.; Illig, Sandra B.; Linn, Richard T.; Gonzales, Vera A.; Granger, Carl V.

In: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 82, No. 9, 01.09.2003, p. 692-699.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tooth, Leigh R. ; Ottenbacher, Kenneth ; Smith, Pamela M. ; Illig, Sandra B. ; Linn, Richard T. ; Gonzales, Vera A. ; Granger, Carl V. / Effect of functional gain on satisfaction with medical rehabilitation after stroke. In: American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2003 ; Vol. 82, No. 9. pp. 692-699.
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