Effect of intrauterine fetal programming on response to postnatal shaker stress in endothelial nitric oxide knockout mouse model

Maged Costantine, Francesca Ferrari, Giuseppe Chiossi, Esther Tamayo, Gary Hankins, George Saade, Monica Longo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether the intrauterine environment affects the postnatal vascular response to stress in a model of fetal programming induced by endothelial nitric oxide synthase deficiency. Study Design: Homozygous nitric oxide synthase knockout and wild-type controls were crossbred to obtain maternally and paternally derived heterozygous offspring. At 14 weeks of age, in vivo blood pressure measurements by telemetry, and in vitro carotid arteries vascular reactivity studies were performed in male offspring after subjecting them to shaker stress. Results: Maternally derived heterozygous offspring, compared with paternally derived heterozygous offspring, had significantly higher systolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, and pulse pressure before, as well as after introduction of the shaker stress. The difference in the latter between maternally and paternally derived heterozygous offspring was accentuated after stress. Maternally derived heterozygous offspring also had significantly higher contractile responses to phenylephrine when compared with paternally derived heterozygous offspring, and this was abolished after incubation with L-NAME. Conclusion: The adverse uterine environment affects the postnatal vascular response to stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume201
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Fetal Development
Knockout Mice
Blood Vessels
Nitric Oxide
Blood Pressure
Arterial Pressure
Telemetry
Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III
NG-Nitroarginine Methyl Ester
Phenylephrine
Carotid Arteries
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Hypertension

Keywords

  • fetal programming
  • postnatal
  • shaker stress
  • vascular phenotype

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Effect of intrauterine fetal programming on response to postnatal shaker stress in endothelial nitric oxide knockout mouse model. / Costantine, Maged; Ferrari, Francesca; Chiossi, Giuseppe; Tamayo, Esther; Hankins, Gary; Saade, George; Longo, Monica.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 201, No. 3, 09.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Costantine, Maged ; Ferrari, Francesca ; Chiossi, Giuseppe ; Tamayo, Esther ; Hankins, Gary ; Saade, George ; Longo, Monica. / Effect of intrauterine fetal programming on response to postnatal shaker stress in endothelial nitric oxide knockout mouse model. In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2009 ; Vol. 201, No. 3.
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AU - Saade, George

AU - Longo, Monica

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