Effect of passive antibody on congenital cytomegalovirus infection in guinea pigs

D. F. Bratcher, Nigel Bourne, F. J. Bravo, M. R. Schleiss, M. Slaoui, M. G. Myers, D. I. Bernstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common congenital viral infection, but little is known about the protective immune mechanisms. The guinea pig (gp) model of congenital CMV was used to evaluate the effects of passive antibody given to pregnant dams on pup survival. Dams received three doses of high- titer gpCMV or control antibody on days -3, -1, and +7, or +1, +3, and +7, in relation to gpCMV challenge. gpCMV was inoculated in the late second to early third trimester at three different doses. Compared with controls, gpCMV antibody begun before gpCMV challenge significantly increased pup survival from 14% to 52%, 21% to 84%, and 51% to 77%, respectively, for the three challenge doses. gpCMV antibody started after viral challenge increased pup survival after only the lowest challenge dose (51% to 81%). Antibody did not protect against CMV infection of the pups. CMV antibody appeared to improve survival in congenital CMV infection but did not affect vertical transmission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)944-950
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume172
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cytomegalovirus Infections
Guinea Pigs
Antibodies
Cytomegalovirus
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Virus Diseases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Bratcher, D. F., Bourne, N., Bravo, F. J., Schleiss, M. R., Slaoui, M., Myers, M. G., & Bernstein, D. I. (1995). Effect of passive antibody on congenital cytomegalovirus infection in guinea pigs. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 172(4), 944-950.

Effect of passive antibody on congenital cytomegalovirus infection in guinea pigs. / Bratcher, D. F.; Bourne, Nigel; Bravo, F. J.; Schleiss, M. R.; Slaoui, M.; Myers, M. G.; Bernstein, D. I.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 172, No. 4, 1995, p. 944-950.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bratcher, DF, Bourne, N, Bravo, FJ, Schleiss, MR, Slaoui, M, Myers, MG & Bernstein, DI 1995, 'Effect of passive antibody on congenital cytomegalovirus infection in guinea pigs', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 172, no. 4, pp. 944-950.
Bratcher DF, Bourne N, Bravo FJ, Schleiss MR, Slaoui M, Myers MG et al. Effect of passive antibody on congenital cytomegalovirus infection in guinea pigs. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1995;172(4):944-950.
Bratcher, D. F. ; Bourne, Nigel ; Bravo, F. J. ; Schleiss, M. R. ; Slaoui, M. ; Myers, M. G. ; Bernstein, D. I. / Effect of passive antibody on congenital cytomegalovirus infection in guinea pigs. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1995 ; Vol. 172, No. 4. pp. 944-950.
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