Effect of season and climate on choice of therapy for breast cancer in older women

James Goodwin, A. B. Nattinger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We and others have previously found a relative underutilization of breast-conserving surgery with adjuvant radiation therapy in older women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. Because adjuvant radiotherapy involves daily trips to a facility for 6 weeks, we reasoned that season and climate might influence choice of therapy. Specifically we hypothesized that in northern states, a lower proportion of women would receive breast-conserving surgery plus radiation in the winter months than in summer, whereas in sunbelt states there would be no relationship between season and therapy. DESIGN: Analysis of national Medicare billing tapes for 1990 and SEER tumor registry data for 1983-1990. PARTICIPANTS: 43,083 women aged 65 to 79, diagnosed with local or regional breast cancer in 50 states or Washington, DC, who underwent mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery in 1990, and 32,502 women aged 65 to 79 who underwent mastectomy or breast- conserving surgery from 1983 to 1989 at any of the nine SEER sites. RESULTS: Using a variety of analytical approaches, we could find no consistent effect of cold winter climate on choice of breast cancer therapy. CONCLUSION: Bad weather does not appear to discourage the choice of breast-conserving treatment. It is not known if bad weather influences actual receipt of radiotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)962-966
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume43
Issue number9
StatePublished - 1995

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Segmental Mastectomy
Climate
Breast Neoplasms
Mastectomy
Weather
Radiotherapy
Cold Climate
Adjuvant Radiotherapy
Therapeutics
Medicare
Registries
Breast
Radiation
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Effect of season and climate on choice of therapy for breast cancer in older women. / Goodwin, James; Nattinger, A. B.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 43, No. 9, 1995, p. 962-966.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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