Effects of adjunct testosterone on cardiac morphology and function in advanced cancers: An ancillary analysis of a randomized controlled trial

Jessica M. Scott, Edgar Dillon, Michael Kinsky, Albert Chamberlain, Susan McCammon, Daniel Jupiter, Maurice Willis, Sandra Hatch, Gwyn Richardson, Christopher Danesi, Kathleen Randolph, William Durham, Traver Wright, Randall Urban, Melinda Sheffield-Moore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Adjunct testosterone therapy improves lean body mass, quality of life, and physical activity in patients with advanced cancers; however, the effects of testosterone on cardiac morphology and function are unknown. Accordingly, as an ancillary analysis of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of testosterone supplementation on body composition in men and women with advanced cancers, we explored whether testosterone supplementation could prevent or reverse left ventricular (LV) atrophy and dysfunction. Methods: Men and women recently diagnosed with late stage (≥IIB) or recurrent head and neck or cervical cancer who were scheduled to receive standard of care chemotherapy or concurrent chemoradiation were administered an adjunct 7 week treatment of weekly intramuscular injections of either 100 mg testosterone (T, n = 1 M/5F) or placebo (P, n = 6 M/4F) in a double-blinded randomized fashion. LV morphology (wall thickness), systolic function (ejection fraction, EF), diastolic function (E/A; E'/E), arterial elastance (Ea), end-systolic elastance (Ees), and ventricular-arterial coupling (Ea/Ees) were assessed. Results: No significant differences were observed in LV posterior wall thickness in placebo (pre: 1.10 ± 0.1 cm; post: 1.16 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.11) or testosterone groups (pre: 0.99 ± 0.1 cm; post: 1.14 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.22). Compared with placebo, testosterone significantly improved LVEF (placebo: - 1.8 ± 4.3%; testosterone: + 6.2 ± 4.3%; p < 0.05), Ea (placebo: 0.0 ± 0.2 mmHg/mL; testosterone: - 0.3 ± 0.2 mmHg/mL; p < 0.05), and Ea/Ees (placebo: 0.0 ± 0.1; testosterone: - 0.2 ± 0.1; p < 0.05). Conclusions: In patients with advanced cancers, testosterone was associated with favorable changes in left ventricular systolic function, arterial elastance, and ventricular-arterial coupling. Given the small sample size, the promising multisystem benefits of testosterone warrants further evaluation in a definitive randomized trial. Trial registration: This study was prospectively registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00878995; date of registration: April 9, 2009).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number778
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 7 2019

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Testosterone
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Neoplasms
Intramuscular Injections
Left Ventricular Dysfunction
Standard of Care
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Body Composition
Left Ventricular Function
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Sample Size
Atrophy
Quality of Life
Exercise
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Cachexia
  • Cardiac function
  • Testosterone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Effects of adjunct testosterone on cardiac morphology and function in advanced cancers : An ancillary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. / Scott, Jessica M.; Dillon, Edgar; Kinsky, Michael; Chamberlain, Albert; McCammon, Susan; Jupiter, Daniel; Willis, Maurice; Hatch, Sandra; Richardson, Gwyn; Danesi, Christopher; Randolph, Kathleen; Durham, William; Wright, Traver; Urban, Randall; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda.

In: BMC Cancer, Vol. 19, No. 1, 778, 07.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scott, Jessica M. ; Dillon, Edgar ; Kinsky, Michael ; Chamberlain, Albert ; McCammon, Susan ; Jupiter, Daniel ; Willis, Maurice ; Hatch, Sandra ; Richardson, Gwyn ; Danesi, Christopher ; Randolph, Kathleen ; Durham, William ; Wright, Traver ; Urban, Randall ; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda. / Effects of adjunct testosterone on cardiac morphology and function in advanced cancers : An ancillary analysis of a randomized controlled trial. In: BMC Cancer. 2019 ; Vol. 19, No. 1.
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abstract = "Background: Adjunct testosterone therapy improves lean body mass, quality of life, and physical activity in patients with advanced cancers; however, the effects of testosterone on cardiac morphology and function are unknown. Accordingly, as an ancillary analysis of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of testosterone supplementation on body composition in men and women with advanced cancers, we explored whether testosterone supplementation could prevent or reverse left ventricular (LV) atrophy and dysfunction. Methods: Men and women recently diagnosed with late stage (≥IIB) or recurrent head and neck or cervical cancer who were scheduled to receive standard of care chemotherapy or concurrent chemoradiation were administered an adjunct 7 week treatment of weekly intramuscular injections of either 100 mg testosterone (T, n = 1 M/5F) or placebo (P, n = 6 M/4F) in a double-blinded randomized fashion. LV morphology (wall thickness), systolic function (ejection fraction, EF), diastolic function (E/A; E'/E), arterial elastance (Ea), end-systolic elastance (Ees), and ventricular-arterial coupling (Ea/Ees) were assessed. Results: No significant differences were observed in LV posterior wall thickness in placebo (pre: 1.10 ± 0.1 cm; post: 1.16 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.11) or testosterone groups (pre: 0.99 ± 0.1 cm; post: 1.14 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.22). Compared with placebo, testosterone significantly improved LVEF (placebo: - 1.8 ± 4.3{\%}; testosterone: + 6.2 ± 4.3{\%}; p < 0.05), Ea (placebo: 0.0 ± 0.2 mmHg/mL; testosterone: - 0.3 ± 0.2 mmHg/mL; p < 0.05), and Ea/Ees (placebo: 0.0 ± 0.1; testosterone: - 0.2 ± 0.1; p < 0.05). Conclusions: In patients with advanced cancers, testosterone was associated with favorable changes in left ventricular systolic function, arterial elastance, and ventricular-arterial coupling. Given the small sample size, the promising multisystem benefits of testosterone warrants further evaluation in a definitive randomized trial. Trial registration: This study was prospectively registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00878995; date of registration: April 9, 2009).",
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T1 - Effects of adjunct testosterone on cardiac morphology and function in advanced cancers

T2 - An ancillary analysis of a randomized controlled trial

AU - Scott, Jessica M.

AU - Dillon, Edgar

AU - Kinsky, Michael

AU - Chamberlain, Albert

AU - McCammon, Susan

AU - Jupiter, Daniel

AU - Willis, Maurice

AU - Hatch, Sandra

AU - Richardson, Gwyn

AU - Danesi, Christopher

AU - Randolph, Kathleen

AU - Durham, William

AU - Wright, Traver

AU - Urban, Randall

AU - Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

PY - 2019/8/7

Y1 - 2019/8/7

N2 - Background: Adjunct testosterone therapy improves lean body mass, quality of life, and physical activity in patients with advanced cancers; however, the effects of testosterone on cardiac morphology and function are unknown. Accordingly, as an ancillary analysis of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of testosterone supplementation on body composition in men and women with advanced cancers, we explored whether testosterone supplementation could prevent or reverse left ventricular (LV) atrophy and dysfunction. Methods: Men and women recently diagnosed with late stage (≥IIB) or recurrent head and neck or cervical cancer who were scheduled to receive standard of care chemotherapy or concurrent chemoradiation were administered an adjunct 7 week treatment of weekly intramuscular injections of either 100 mg testosterone (T, n = 1 M/5F) or placebo (P, n = 6 M/4F) in a double-blinded randomized fashion. LV morphology (wall thickness), systolic function (ejection fraction, EF), diastolic function (E/A; E'/E), arterial elastance (Ea), end-systolic elastance (Ees), and ventricular-arterial coupling (Ea/Ees) were assessed. Results: No significant differences were observed in LV posterior wall thickness in placebo (pre: 1.10 ± 0.1 cm; post: 1.16 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.11) or testosterone groups (pre: 0.99 ± 0.1 cm; post: 1.14 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.22). Compared with placebo, testosterone significantly improved LVEF (placebo: - 1.8 ± 4.3%; testosterone: + 6.2 ± 4.3%; p < 0.05), Ea (placebo: 0.0 ± 0.2 mmHg/mL; testosterone: - 0.3 ± 0.2 mmHg/mL; p < 0.05), and Ea/Ees (placebo: 0.0 ± 0.1; testosterone: - 0.2 ± 0.1; p < 0.05). Conclusions: In patients with advanced cancers, testosterone was associated with favorable changes in left ventricular systolic function, arterial elastance, and ventricular-arterial coupling. Given the small sample size, the promising multisystem benefits of testosterone warrants further evaluation in a definitive randomized trial. Trial registration: This study was prospectively registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00878995; date of registration: April 9, 2009).

AB - Background: Adjunct testosterone therapy improves lean body mass, quality of life, and physical activity in patients with advanced cancers; however, the effects of testosterone on cardiac morphology and function are unknown. Accordingly, as an ancillary analysis of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial investigating the efficacy of testosterone supplementation on body composition in men and women with advanced cancers, we explored whether testosterone supplementation could prevent or reverse left ventricular (LV) atrophy and dysfunction. Methods: Men and women recently diagnosed with late stage (≥IIB) or recurrent head and neck or cervical cancer who were scheduled to receive standard of care chemotherapy or concurrent chemoradiation were administered an adjunct 7 week treatment of weekly intramuscular injections of either 100 mg testosterone (T, n = 1 M/5F) or placebo (P, n = 6 M/4F) in a double-blinded randomized fashion. LV morphology (wall thickness), systolic function (ejection fraction, EF), diastolic function (E/A; E'/E), arterial elastance (Ea), end-systolic elastance (Ees), and ventricular-arterial coupling (Ea/Ees) were assessed. Results: No significant differences were observed in LV posterior wall thickness in placebo (pre: 1.10 ± 0.1 cm; post: 1.16 ± 0.2 cm; p = 0.11) or testosterone groups (pre: 0.99 ± 0.1 cm; post: 1.14 ± 0.20 cm; p = 0.22). Compared with placebo, testosterone significantly improved LVEF (placebo: - 1.8 ± 4.3%; testosterone: + 6.2 ± 4.3%; p < 0.05), Ea (placebo: 0.0 ± 0.2 mmHg/mL; testosterone: - 0.3 ± 0.2 mmHg/mL; p < 0.05), and Ea/Ees (placebo: 0.0 ± 0.1; testosterone: - 0.2 ± 0.1; p < 0.05). Conclusions: In patients with advanced cancers, testosterone was associated with favorable changes in left ventricular systolic function, arterial elastance, and ventricular-arterial coupling. Given the small sample size, the promising multisystem benefits of testosterone warrants further evaluation in a definitive randomized trial. Trial registration: This study was prospectively registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00878995; date of registration: April 9, 2009).

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KW - Cardiac function

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