Effects of hypoproteinemia and increased vascular pressure on lung fluid balance in sheep

George Kramer, B. A. Harms, B. I. Bodai, E. M. Renkin, R. H. Demling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We compared the effects of a sustained decrease in plasma oncotic pressure on lung fluid balance with those of an increase in vascular pressure in six unanesthetized sheep. Initial plasma protein concentration of 58.0 ± 2.2 (SE) mg/ml was quickly reduced to 34.0 ± 1.4 mg/ml via plasmapheresis and held at this value for 24 h. Red cells were returned with lactated Ringer solution infused at a rate adjusted to maintain central venous pressure; cardiac output and pulmonary vascular pressure also remained at base line. Steady-state lymph flows increased from a base-line value of 8.8 ± 3.2 to 20.1 ± 5.6 ml/h, while the lymph-to-plasma protein concentration ratio ([L/P]) decreased from 0.65 ± 0.03 to 0.44 ± 0.04. Decreased lymph protein resulted in reestablishment of base-line plasma-to-lymph oncotic gradient. The increased lymph flow was not the result of increased filtration forces, since all vascular pressures and the oncotic gradient were unchanged; nor was it due entirely to increased surface area since [L/P] was decreased. The decrease in plasma oncotic pressure, ΔπP, was twice as effective at increasing lymph flow (1.66 ml·h-1·mmHg-1, ΔπP) as an equivalent increase in microvascular pressure, ΔP(C,) at normal plasma protein concentration (0.82 ml·h-1·mmHg-1, ΔP(C). Elevation of microvascular pressure during hypoproteinemia had a greater effect on lymph flow (1.44 ml·h-1·mmHg-1, ΔP(C)) than at normal plasma protein concentration. We conclude that reduction in plasma oncotic pressure increase pulmonary fluid filtration to a greater extent than equivalent increases in hydrostatic pressure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1514-1522
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology
Volume55
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Hypoproteinemia
Water-Electrolyte Balance
Lymph
Blood Vessels
Sheep
Pressure
Lung
Blood Proteins
Central Venous Pressure
Hydrostatic Pressure
Plasmapheresis
Cardiac Output

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

Effects of hypoproteinemia and increased vascular pressure on lung fluid balance in sheep. / Kramer, George; Harms, B. A.; Bodai, B. I.; Renkin, E. M.; Demling, R. H.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology Respiratory Environmental and Exercise Physiology, Vol. 55, No. 5, 1983, p. 1514-1522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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