Effects of the decellularization method on the local stiffness of acellular lungs

Esther Melo, Elena Garreta, Tomas Luque, Joaquin Cortiella, Joan Nichols, Daniel Navajas, Ramon Farré

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung bioengineering, a novel approach to obtain organs potentially available for transplantation, is based on decellularizing donor lungs and seeding natural scaffolds with stem cells. Various physicochemical protocols have been used to decellularize lungs, and their performance has been evaluated in terms of efficient decellularization and matrix preservation. No data are available, however, on the effect of different decellularization procedures on the local stiffness of the acellular lung. This information is important since stem cells directly sense the rigidity of the local site they are engrafting to during recellularization, and it has been shown that substrate stiffness modulates cell fate into different phenotypes. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of the decellularization procedure on the inhomogeneous local stiffness of the acellular lung on five different sites: alveolar septa, alveolar junctions, pleura, and vessels' tunica intima and tunica adventitia. Local matrix stiffness was measured by computing Young's modulus with atomic force microscopy after decellularizing the lungs of 36 healthy rats (Sprague-Dawley, male, 250-300? g) with four different protocols with/without perfusion through the lung circulatory system and using two different detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate [SDS] and 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1- propanesulfonate [CHAPS]). The local stiffness of the acellular lung matrix significantly depended on the site within the matrix (p<0.001), ranging from ∼15? kPa at the alveolar septum to ∼60? kPa at the tunica intima. Acellular lung stiffness (p=0.003) depended significantly, albeit modestly, on the decellularization process. Whereas perfusion did not induce any significant differences in stiffness, the use of CHAPS resulted in a ∼35% reduction compared with SDS, the influence of the detergent being more important in the tunica intima. In conclusion, lung matrix stiffness is considerably inhomogeneous, and conventional decellularization procedures do not result in substantially different local stiffness in the acellular lung.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-422
Number of pages11
JournalTissue Engineering - Part C: Methods
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2014

Fingerprint

Stiffness
Lung
Tunica Intima
Detergents
Sodium dodecyl sulfate
Stiffness matrix
Stem cells
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Stem Cells
Perfusion
Scaffolds
Rigidity
Rats
Atomic force microscopy
Bioengineering
Adventitia
Elastic moduli
Pleura
Atomic Force Microscopy
Elastic Modulus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of the decellularization method on the local stiffness of acellular lungs. / Melo, Esther; Garreta, Elena; Luque, Tomas; Cortiella, Joaquin; Nichols, Joan; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon.

In: Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods, Vol. 20, No. 5, 01.05.2014, p. 412-422.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Melo, Esther ; Garreta, Elena ; Luque, Tomas ; Cortiella, Joaquin ; Nichols, Joan ; Navajas, Daniel ; Farré, Ramon. / Effects of the decellularization method on the local stiffness of acellular lungs. In: Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods. 2014 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 412-422.
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