Eilat virus, a unique alphavirus with host range restricted to insects by RNA replication

Farooq Nasar, Gustavo Palacios, Rodion V. Gorchakov, Hilda Guzman, Amelia P. Travassos Da Rosa, Nazir Savji, Vsevolod Popov, Michael Sherman, W. Ian Lipkin, Robert B. Tesh, Scott Weaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most alphaviruses and many other arboviruses are mosquito-borne and exhibit a broad host range, infecting many different vertebrates including birds, rodents, equids, humans, and nonhuman primates. Consequently, they can be propagated in most vertebrate and insect cell cultures. This ability of arboviruses to infect arthropods and vertebrates is usually essential for their maintenance in nature. However, several flaviviruses have recently been described that infect mosquitoes but not vertebrates, although the mechanism of their host restriction has not been determined. Here we describe a unique alphavirus, Eilat virus (EILV), isolated from a pool of Anopheles coustani mosquitoes from the Negev desert of Israel. Phylogenetic analyses placed EILV as a sister to the Western equine encephalitis antigenic complex within the main clade of mosquito-borne alphaviruses. Electron microscopy revealed that, like other alphaviruses, EILV virions were spherical, 70 nm in diameter, and budded from the plasma membrane of mosquito cells in culture. EILV readily infected a variety of insect cells with little overt cytopathic effect. However, in contrast to typical mosquito-borne alphaviruses, EILV could not infect mammalian or avian cell lines, and viral as well as RNA replication could not be detected at 37°C or 28°C. Evolutionarily, these findings suggest that EILV lost its ability to infect vertebrate cells. Thus, EILV seems to be mosquito-specific and represents a previously undescribed complex within the genus Alphavirus. Reverse genetic studies of EILV may facilitate the discovery of determinants of alphavirus host range that mediate disease emergence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)14622-14627
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume109
Issue number36
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 4 2012

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Alphavirus
Host Specificity
Culicidae
Insects
RNA
Viruses
Vertebrates
Arboviruses
Western Equine Encephalomyelitis
Cell Culture Techniques
Reverse Genetics
Flavivirus
Anopheles
Arthropods
Israel
Virion
Primates
Birds
Rodentia
Electron Microscopy

Keywords

  • Evolution
  • Togavirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Eilat virus, a unique alphavirus with host range restricted to insects by RNA replication. / Nasar, Farooq; Palacios, Gustavo; Gorchakov, Rodion V.; Guzman, Hilda; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P.; Savji, Nazir; Popov, Vsevolod; Sherman, Michael; Lipkin, W. Ian; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 109, No. 36, 04.09.2012, p. 14622-14627.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nasar, Farooq ; Palacios, Gustavo ; Gorchakov, Rodion V. ; Guzman, Hilda ; Travassos Da Rosa, Amelia P. ; Savji, Nazir ; Popov, Vsevolod ; Sherman, Michael ; Lipkin, W. Ian ; Tesh, Robert B. ; Weaver, Scott. / Eilat virus, a unique alphavirus with host range restricted to insects by RNA replication. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2012 ; Vol. 109, No. 36. pp. 14622-14627.
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