Electrical injuries

A 30-year review

Jyoti Rai, Marc G. Jeschke, Robert E. Barrow, David Herndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Electrical injuries currently remain a worldwide problem. This study determines whether electrical injuries at our institution have changed in the past 30 years, and identifies electrical burn complications and any high-risk groups. Methods: From 1967 to 1997, 185 children admitted to our institute were identified with electrical burns. Fifty-five percent of these electrical burns occurred from 1987 to 1997. Results: During the last 10 years of this study, 43% of the electrical injuries (n = 44) were from low voltage (120-240 V) and 57% (n = 58) from high voltage (> 1,000 V). In 17 children, serious low-voltage burns were identified as oral commissure burns. These were treated conservatively with one to two reconstructive procedures within 2 years. High-voltage injuries were mainly identified in male children (age 11 to 18 years). Thirty-three percent of high-voltage burns required amputation, 29% had deep muscle involvement, and 24% required either escharotomy or fasciotomy. No mortalities were reported. Conclusion: Although the incidence of low-voltage burns is currently on a steady decline, high- voltage injuries remain a problem, particularly in adolescent males.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)933-936
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care
Volume46
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1999

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Burns
Wounds and Injuries
Amputation
Muscles
Mortality
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Electrical injuries : A 30-year review. / Rai, Jyoti; Jeschke, Marc G.; Barrow, Robert E.; Herndon, David.

In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care, Vol. 46, No. 5, 05.1999, p. 933-936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rai, Jyoti ; Jeschke, Marc G. ; Barrow, Robert E. ; Herndon, David. / Electrical injuries : A 30-year review. In: Journal of Trauma - Injury, Infection and Critical Care. 1999 ; Vol. 46, No. 5. pp. 933-936.
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