Elevated Carbon Monoxide in the Exhaled Breath of Mice during a Systemic Bacterial Infection

Alan G. Barbour, Charlotte M. Hirsch, Arash Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Simone Meinardi, Eric R G Lewis, Azadeh Shojaee Estabragh, Donald R. Blake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blood is the specimen of choice for most laboratory tests for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Sampling exhaled breath is a noninvasive alternative to phlebotomy and has the potential for real-time monitoring at the bedside. Improved instrumentation has advanced breath analysis for several gaseous compounds from humans. However, application to small animal models of diseases and physiology has been limited. To extend breath analysis to mice, we crafted a means for collecting nose-only breath samples from groups and individual animals who were awake. Samples were subjected to gas chromatography and mass spectrometry procedures developed for highly sensitive analysis of trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere. We evaluated the system with experimental systemic infections of severe combined immunodeficiency Mus musculus with the bacterium Borrelia hermsii. Infected mice developed bacterial densities of ∼107 per ml of blood by day 4 or 5 and in comparison to uninfected controls had hepatosplenomegaly and elevations of both inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. While 12 samples from individual infected mice on days 4 and 5 and 6 samples from uninfected mice did not significantly differ for 72 different VOCs, carbon monoxide (CO) was elevated in samples from infected mice, with a mean (95% confidence limits) effect size of 4.2 (2.8-5.6), when differences in CO2 in the breath were taken into account. Normalized CO values declined to the uninfected range after one day of treatment with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Strongly correlated with CO in the breath were levels of heme oxygenase-1 protein in serum and HMOX1 transcripts in whole blood. These results (i) provide further evidence of the informativeness of CO concentration in the exhaled breath during systemic infection and inflammation, and (ii) encourage evaluation of this noninvasive analytic approach in other various other rodent models of infection and for utility in clinical management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere69802
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 31 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

carbon monoxide
Carbon Monoxide
bacterial infections
Bacterial Infections
Volatile Organic Compounds
Blood
mice
Animals
volatile organic compounds
sampling
Heme Oxygenase-1
heme oxygenase (biliverdin-producing)
Borrelia hermsii
Ceftriaxone
Monitoring
blood
Physiology
Infection
animal disease models
severe combined immunodeficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Barbour, A. G., Hirsch, C. M., Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, A., Meinardi, S., Lewis, E. R. G., Estabragh, A. S., & Blake, D. R. (2013). Elevated Carbon Monoxide in the Exhaled Breath of Mice during a Systemic Bacterial Infection. PLoS One, 8(7), [e69802]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069802

Elevated Carbon Monoxide in the Exhaled Breath of Mice during a Systemic Bacterial Infection. / Barbour, Alan G.; Hirsch, Charlotte M.; Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Arash; Meinardi, Simone; Lewis, Eric R G; Estabragh, Azadeh Shojaee; Blake, Donald R.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 7, e69802, 31.07.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Barbour, AG, Hirsch, CM, Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, A, Meinardi, S, Lewis, ERG, Estabragh, AS & Blake, DR 2013, 'Elevated Carbon Monoxide in the Exhaled Breath of Mice during a Systemic Bacterial Infection', PLoS One, vol. 8, no. 7, e69802. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069802
Barbour AG, Hirsch CM, Ghalyanchi Langeroudi A, Meinardi S, Lewis ERG, Estabragh AS et al. Elevated Carbon Monoxide in the Exhaled Breath of Mice during a Systemic Bacterial Infection. PLoS One. 2013 Jul 31;8(7). e69802. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0069802
Barbour, Alan G. ; Hirsch, Charlotte M. ; Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Arash ; Meinardi, Simone ; Lewis, Eric R G ; Estabragh, Azadeh Shojaee ; Blake, Donald R. / Elevated Carbon Monoxide in the Exhaled Breath of Mice during a Systemic Bacterial Infection. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 7.
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