ELISA for the detection of antibodies to Ebola viruses

Thomas Ksiazek, Cynthia P. West, Pierre E. Rollin, Peter B. Jahrling, C. J. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

187 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

EIAs for IgG and IgM antibodies directed against Ebola (EBO) viral antigens have been developed and evaluated using sera of animals and humans surviving infection with EBO viruses. The IgM capture assay detected anti- EBO (subtype Reston) antibodies in the sera of 5 of 5 experimentally infected animals at the time they succumbed to lethal infections. IgM antibodies were also detected in the serum of a human who was infected with EBO (subtype Reston) during a postmortem examination of an infected monkey. The antibody was detectable as early as day 6 after infection in experimentally infected animals and persisted for <90 days. The IgG response was less rapid; however, it persisted for >400 days in 3 animals who survived infection, and it persisted for ~10 years after infection in the sera of 2 humans. Although these data are limited by the number of sera available for verification, the IgM assay seems to have great promise as a diagnostic tool. Furthermore the long-term persistence of the IgG antibodies measured by this test strongly suggests that the ELISA will be useful in field investigations of EBO virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume179
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
StatePublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Ebolavirus
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Immunoglobulin M
Antibodies
Serum
Infection
Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
Immunoglobulin G
Viral Antigens
Haplorhini
Autopsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Immunology

Cite this

Ksiazek, T., West, C. P., Rollin, P. E., Jahrling, P. B., & Peters, C. J. (1999). ELISA for the detection of antibodies to Ebola viruses. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 179(SUPPL. 1).

ELISA for the detection of antibodies to Ebola viruses. / Ksiazek, Thomas; West, Cynthia P.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Jahrling, Peter B.; Peters, C. J.

In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol. 179, No. SUPPL. 1, 1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ksiazek, T, West, CP, Rollin, PE, Jahrling, PB & Peters, CJ 1999, 'ELISA for the detection of antibodies to Ebola viruses', Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 179, no. SUPPL. 1.
Ksiazek T, West CP, Rollin PE, Jahrling PB, Peters CJ. ELISA for the detection of antibodies to Ebola viruses. Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1999;179(SUPPL. 1).
Ksiazek, Thomas ; West, Cynthia P. ; Rollin, Pierre E. ; Jahrling, Peter B. ; Peters, C. J. / ELISA for the detection of antibodies to Ebola viruses. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1999 ; Vol. 179, No. SUPPL. 1.
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