Energy intake and expenditure during sedentary screen time and motion-controlled video gaming

Elizabeth Lyons, Deborah F. Tate, Dianne S. Ward, Xiaoshan Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Television watching and playing of video games (VGs) are associated with higher energy intakes. Motion-controlled video games (MC) may be a healthier alternative to sedentary screen-based activities because of higher energy expenditures, but little is known about the effects of these games on energy intakes. Objective: Energy intake, expenditure, and surplus (intake 2 expenditure) were compared during sedentary (television and VG) and active (MC) screen-time use. Design: Young adults (n = 120; 60 women) were randomly assigned to the following 3 groups: television watching, playing traditional VGs, or playing MCs for 1 h while snacks and beverages were provided. Energy intakes, energy expenditures, and appetites were measured. Results: Intakes across these 3 groups showed a trend toward a significant difference (P = 0.065). The energy expenditure (P < 0.001) was higher, and the energy surplus (P = 0.038) was lower, in MC than in television or VG groups. All conditions produced a mean (6SD) energy surplus as follows: 638 ± 408 kcal in television, 655 ± 533 kcal in VG, and 376 ± 487 kcal in MC groups. The OR for consuming ≥500 kcal in the television compared with the MC group was 3.2 (95% CI: 1.2, 8.4). Secondary analyses, in which the 2 sedentary conditions were collapsed, showed an intake that was 178 kcal (95% CI: 8, 349 kcal) lower in the MC condition than in the sedentary groups (television and VG). Conclusion: MCs may be a healthier alternative to sedentary screen time because of a lower energy surplus, but the playing of these games still resulted in a positive energy balance. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01523795.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)234-239
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume96
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Video Games
Television
Energy Intake
Energy Metabolism
Snacks
Beverages
Appetite
Health Expenditures
Young Adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Energy intake and expenditure during sedentary screen time and motion-controlled video gaming. / Lyons, Elizabeth; Tate, Deborah F.; Ward, Dianne S.; Wang, Xiaoshan.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 96, No. 2, 01.08.2012, p. 234-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyons, Elizabeth ; Tate, Deborah F. ; Ward, Dianne S. ; Wang, Xiaoshan. / Energy intake and expenditure during sedentary screen time and motion-controlled video gaming. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2012 ; Vol. 96, No. 2. pp. 234-239.
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