Ethnicity, education attainment, media exposure, and prenatal care in Vietnam

Ha Ngoc Trinh, Kim Korinek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Prenatal care coverage in Vietnam has been improving, but ethnic minority women still lag behind in receiving adequate level and type of care. This paper examines ethnic disparities in prenatal care utilization by comparing two groups of ethnic minority and majority women. Design. We examine the roots of ethnic disparity in prenatal care utilization, focusing on how education and media exposure change health behaviours and lessen disparities. We rely on the 2002 Vietnam Demographic and Health Survey to draw our sample, predictors and the three dimensions of prenatal care, including timing of onset, frequency of visits, and type of provider. Results. Results from multinomial-, and binary-logistic regression provide evidence that ethnic minority women are less likely to obtain frequent prenatal care and seek care from professional providers than their majority counterparts. However, we find that ethnic minority women are more likely to obtain early care compared to ethnic majority women. Results for predicted probabilities suggest that education and media exposure positively influenced prenatal care behaviours with higher level of education and media exposure associating with accelerated probability of meeting prenatal care requirements. Conclusion. Our results imply the needs for expansion of media access and schools as well as positive health messages being broadcasted in culturally competent ways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-104
Number of pages22
JournalEthnicity and Health
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prenatal Care
Vietnam
ethnicity
Education
education
national minority
ethnic structure
Minority Groups
Health Behavior
utilization
Media Education
Ethnic Groups
Viet Nam
Logistic Models
Demography
health behavior
health
level of education
Health
coverage

Keywords

  • ethnic disparities
  • media exposure
  • Prenatal care utilization
  • Vietnam
  • women’s education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Ethnicity, education attainment, media exposure, and prenatal care in Vietnam. / Trinh, Ha Ngoc; Korinek, Kim.

In: Ethnicity and Health, Vol. 22, No. 1, 02.01.2017, p. 83-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Trinh, Ha Ngoc ; Korinek, Kim. / Ethnicity, education attainment, media exposure, and prenatal care in Vietnam. In: Ethnicity and Health. 2017 ; Vol. 22, No. 1. pp. 83-104.
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