Evaluation and management of common childhood poisonings

Tamara McGregor, Mehjabin Parkar, Shobha Rao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Family physicians often manage substance ingestions in children, most of which are nontoxic in nature. Physicians should know the phone number of the poison control center, understand the appropriate initial assessment of suspected toxin ingestion, and recognize important toxidromes. Rapid triage is crucial, including airway, respiration, and circulation stabilization. Appropriate supportive or toxin-specific treatment should be initiated. Gastric decontamination, such as activated charcoal and gastric lavage, are no longer routinely recommended. These methods should be reserved for the most severe cases, with poison control center support. The use of ipecac is no longer recommended. A child with few symptoms or a witnessed toxin exposure may be monitored at home. However, some long-acting medications have delayed toxin effects and require additional surveillance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-403
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume79
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Poison Control Centers
Poisoning
Ipecac
Eating
Gastric Lavage
Decontamination
Triage
Charcoal
Family Physicians
Stomach
Respiration
Physicians
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

McGregor, T., Parkar, M., & Rao, S. (2009). Evaluation and management of common childhood poisonings. American Family Physician, 79(5), 397-403.

Evaluation and management of common childhood poisonings. / McGregor, Tamara; Parkar, Mehjabin; Rao, Shobha.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 79, No. 5, 01.03.2009, p. 397-403.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

McGregor, T, Parkar, M & Rao, S 2009, 'Evaluation and management of common childhood poisonings', American Family Physician, vol. 79, no. 5, pp. 397-403.
McGregor T, Parkar M, Rao S. Evaluation and management of common childhood poisonings. American Family Physician. 2009 Mar 1;79(5):397-403.
McGregor, Tamara ; Parkar, Mehjabin ; Rao, Shobha. / Evaluation and management of common childhood poisonings. In: American Family Physician. 2009 ; Vol. 79, No. 5. pp. 397-403.
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