Evaluation of a commercial flatbed document scanner and radiographic film scanner for radiochromic EBT film dosimetry

Jason E. Matney, Brent Parker, Daniel W. Neck, Greg Henkelmann, Isaac I. Rosen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to quantify the performance and assess the utility of two different types of scanners for radiochromic EBT film dosimetry: a commercial flatbed document scanner and a widely used radiographic film scanner. We evaluated the Epson Perfection V700 Photo flatbed scanner and the Vidar VXR Dosimetry Pro Advantage scanner as measurement devices for radiochromic EBT film. Measurements were made of scan orientation effects, response uniformity, and scanner noise. Scanners were tested using films irradiated with eight separate 3×3cm2 fields to doses ranging from 0.115-5.119 Gy. ImageJ and RIT software was used for analyzing the Epson and Vidar scans, respectively. For repeated scans of a single film, the measurements in each dose region were reproducible to within ± 0.3% standard deviation (SD) with both scanners. Film-to-film variations for corresponding doses were measured to be within ± 0.4% SD for both Epson scanner and Vidar scanners. Overall, the Epson scanner showed a 10% smaller range of pixel value compared to the Vidar scanner. Scanner noise was small: ± 0.3% SD for the Epson and ± 0.2% for the Vidar. Overall measurement uniformity for blank film in both systems was better than ± 2%, provided that the leading and trailing 2 cm film edges were neglected in the Vidar system. In this region artifacts are attributed to the film rollers. Neither system demonstrated a clear measurement advantage. The Epson scanner is a relatively inexpensive method for analyzing radiochromic film, but there is a lack of commercially available software. For a clinic already using a Vidar scanner, applying it to radiochromic film is attractive because commercial software is available. However, care must be taken to avoid using the leading and trailing film edges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)198-208
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics
Volume11
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Film Dosimetry
X-Ray Film
scanners
Dosimetry
dosimeters
Software
Noise
evaluation
Artifacts
Equipment and Supplies
standard deviation
computer programs
dosage
rollers

Keywords

  • EBT
  • Epson V700
  • Radiochromic film
  • Vidar dosimetry pro

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Evaluation of a commercial flatbed document scanner and radiographic film scanner for radiochromic EBT film dosimetry. / Matney, Jason E.; Parker, Brent; Neck, Daniel W.; Henkelmann, Greg; Rosen, Isaac I.

In: Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2010, p. 198-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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