Evaluation of fungal growth on cellulose-containing and inorganic ceiling tile

E. Karunasena, N. Markham, T. Brasel, J. D. Cooley, D. C. Straus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Buildings with poor indoor air quality (IAQ) frequently have many areas with surface fungal contamination. Studies have demonstrated that certain fungal genera (e.g., Cladosporium, Penicillium, and Stachybotrys) are able to grow on building materials such as wallpaper, drywall, and ceiling tiles, particularly after water damage has occurred. Due to the increasing awareness of sick building syndrome (SBS), it has become essential to identify building materials that prevent the interior growth of fungi. The objective of this study was to identify building materials that would not support the growth of certain fungal genera, regardless of whether an external food source was made available. The growth of three fungal genera (Cladosporium, Penicillium, and Stachybotrys) was evaluated on cellulose-containing ceiling tile (CCT) and inorganic ceiling tile (ICT). Both types of ceiling tile were exposed to environmental conditions which can occur inside a building. Our results show that ICT did not support the growth of these three fungal genera while CCT did. Our data demonstrate that ICT could serve as an ideal replacement for CCT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-95
Number of pages5
JournalMycopathologia
Volume150
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

tiles
Cellulose
microbial growth
cellulose
Stachybotrys
Cladosporium
Penicillium
Growth
Sick Building Syndrome
Indoor Air Pollution
Fungi
home furnishings
Food
Water
air quality
environmental factors
fungi

Keywords

  • Ceiling tile
  • Cladosporium cladosporioides
  • Conidia
  • Penicillium chrysogenum
  • Sick building syndrome
  • Stachybotrys chartarum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Karunasena, E., Markham, N., Brasel, T., Cooley, J. D., & Straus, D. C. (2001). Evaluation of fungal growth on cellulose-containing and inorganic ceiling tile. Mycopathologia, 150(2), 91-95. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010920611811

Evaluation of fungal growth on cellulose-containing and inorganic ceiling tile. / Karunasena, E.; Markham, N.; Brasel, T.; Cooley, J. D.; Straus, D. C.

In: Mycopathologia, Vol. 150, No. 2, 2001, p. 91-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Karunasena, E, Markham, N, Brasel, T, Cooley, JD & Straus, DC 2001, 'Evaluation of fungal growth on cellulose-containing and inorganic ceiling tile', Mycopathologia, vol. 150, no. 2, pp. 91-95. https://doi.org/10.1023/A:1010920611811
Karunasena, E. ; Markham, N. ; Brasel, T. ; Cooley, J. D. ; Straus, D. C. / Evaluation of fungal growth on cellulose-containing and inorganic ceiling tile. In: Mycopathologia. 2001 ; Vol. 150, No. 2. pp. 91-95.
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