Evaluation of the aspartate aminotransferase/platelet ratio index and enhanced liver fibrosis tests to detect significant fibrosis due to chronic hepatitis C

John R. Petersen, Heather Stevenson-Lerner, Krishna S. Kasturi, Ashutosh Naniwadekar, Julie Parkes, Richard Cross, William M. Rosenberg, Shu Yuan Xiao, Ned Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:: The assessment of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C patients is important for prognosis and making decisions regarding antiviral treatment. Although liver biopsy is considered the reference standard for assessing hepatic fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C, it is invasive and associated with sampling and interobserver variability. Serum fibrosis markers have been utilized as surrogates for a liver biopsy. METHODS:: We completed a prospective study of 191 patients in which blood draws and liver biopsies were performed on the same visit. Using liver biopsies the sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values for both aspartate aminotransferase/platelet ratio index (APRI) and enhanced liver fibrosis (ELF) were determined. The patients were divided into training and validation patient sets to develop and validate a clinically useful algorithm for differentiating mild and significant fibrosis. RESULTS:: The area under the ROC curve for the APRI and ELF tests for the training set was 0.865 and 0.880, respectively. The clinical sensitivity in separating mild (F0-F1) from significant fibrosis (F2-F4) was 80% and 86.0% with a clinical specificity of 86.7% and 77.8%, respectively. For the validation sets the area under the ROC curve for the APRI and ELF tests was, 0.855 and 0.780, respectively. The clinical sensitivity of the APRI and ELF tests in separating mild (F0-F1) from significant (F2-F4) fibrosis for the validation set was 90.0% and 70.0% with a clinical specificity of 73.3% and 86.7%, respectively. There were no differences between the APRI and ELF tests in distinguishing mild from significant fibrosis for either the training or validation sets (P=0.61 and 0.20, respectively). Using APRI as the primary test followed by ELF for patients in the intermediate zone, would have decreased the number of liver biopsies needed by 40% for the validation set. Overall, use of our algorithm would have decreased the number of patients who needed a liver biopsy from 95 to 24 - a 74.7% reduction. CONCLUSIONS:: This study has shown that the APRI and ELF tests are equally accurate in distinguishing mild from significant liver fibrosis, and combining them into a validated algorithm improves their performance in distinguishing mild from significant fibrosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-376
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume48
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Chronic Hepatitis C
Aspartate Aminotransferases
Liver Cirrhosis
Fibrosis
Blood Platelets
Transaminases
Liver
Biopsy
ROC Curve
Area Under Curve
Observer Variation
Antiviral Agents
Decision Making
Biomarkers
Prospective Studies
Sensitivity and Specificity

Keywords

  • APRI
  • ELF
  • hepatitis C virus
  • liver fibrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Evaluation of the aspartate aminotransferase/platelet ratio index and enhanced liver fibrosis tests to detect significant fibrosis due to chronic hepatitis C. / Petersen, John R.; Stevenson-Lerner, Heather; Kasturi, Krishna S.; Naniwadekar, Ashutosh; Parkes, Julie; Cross, Richard; Rosenberg, William M.; Xiao, Shu Yuan; Snyder, Ned.

In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, Vol. 48, No. 4, 2014, p. 370-376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Petersen, John R. ; Stevenson-Lerner, Heather ; Kasturi, Krishna S. ; Naniwadekar, Ashutosh ; Parkes, Julie ; Cross, Richard ; Rosenberg, William M. ; Xiao, Shu Yuan ; Snyder, Ned. / Evaluation of the aspartate aminotransferase/platelet ratio index and enhanced liver fibrosis tests to detect significant fibrosis due to chronic hepatitis C. In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 2014 ; Vol. 48, No. 4. pp. 370-376.
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