Evidence-Based Current Surgical Practice

Calculous Gallbladder Disease

Casey B. Duncan, Taylor S. Riall

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    57 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Gallbladder disease is common and, if managed incorrectly, can lead to high rates of morbidity, mortality, and extraneous costs. The most common complications of gallstones include biliary colic, acute cholecystitis, common bile duct stones, and gallstone pancreatitis. Ultrasound is the initial imaging modality of choice. Additional diagnostic and therapeutic studies including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasound, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are not routinely required but may play a role in specific situations. Discussion: Biliary colic and acute cholecystitis are best treated with early laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients with common bile duct stones should be managed with cholecystectomy, either after or concurrent with endoscopic or surgical relief of obstruction and clearance of stones from the bile duct. Mild gallstone pancreatitis should be treated with cholecystectomy during the initial hospitalization to prevent recurrence. Emerging techniques for cholecystectomy include single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Early results in highly selected patients demonstrate the safety of these techniques. The management of complications of the gallbladder should be timely and evidence-based, and choice of procedures, particularly for common bile duct stones, is largely influenced by facility and surgeon factors.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2011-2025
    Number of pages15
    JournalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgery
    Volume16
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    Gallbladder Diseases
    Cholecystectomy
    Gallstones
    Acute Cholecystitis
    Colic
    Common Bile Duct
    Pancreatitis
    Natural Orifice Endoscopic Surgery
    Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography
    Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography
    Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy
    Patient Safety
    Bile Ducts
    Gallbladder
    Laparoscopy
    Hospitalization
    Tomography
    Magnetic Resonance Imaging
    Morbidity
    Costs and Cost Analysis

    Keywords

    • Biliary
    • Evidence-based
    • Gallbladder
    • Surgery

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Surgery
    • Gastroenterology

    Cite this

    Evidence-Based Current Surgical Practice : Calculous Gallbladder Disease. / Duncan, Casey B.; Riall, Taylor S.

    In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vol. 16, No. 11, 2012, p. 2011-2025.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Duncan, Casey B. ; Riall, Taylor S. / Evidence-Based Current Surgical Practice : Calculous Gallbladder Disease. In: Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery. 2012 ; Vol. 16, No. 11. pp. 2011-2025.
    @article{817218f5fae54a5295ec2e88b32290a9,
    title = "Evidence-Based Current Surgical Practice: Calculous Gallbladder Disease",
    abstract = "Background: Gallbladder disease is common and, if managed incorrectly, can lead to high rates of morbidity, mortality, and extraneous costs. The most common complications of gallstones include biliary colic, acute cholecystitis, common bile duct stones, and gallstone pancreatitis. Ultrasound is the initial imaging modality of choice. Additional diagnostic and therapeutic studies including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasound, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are not routinely required but may play a role in specific situations. Discussion: Biliary colic and acute cholecystitis are best treated with early laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients with common bile duct stones should be managed with cholecystectomy, either after or concurrent with endoscopic or surgical relief of obstruction and clearance of stones from the bile duct. Mild gallstone pancreatitis should be treated with cholecystectomy during the initial hospitalization to prevent recurrence. Emerging techniques for cholecystectomy include single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Early results in highly selected patients demonstrate the safety of these techniques. The management of complications of the gallbladder should be timely and evidence-based, and choice of procedures, particularly for common bile duct stones, is largely influenced by facility and surgeon factors.",
    keywords = "Biliary, Evidence-based, Gallbladder, Surgery",
    author = "Duncan, {Casey B.} and Riall, {Taylor S.}",
    year = "2012",
    doi = "10.1007/s11605-012-2024-1",
    language = "English",
    volume = "16",
    pages = "2011--2025",
    journal = "Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery",
    issn = "1091-255X",
    publisher = "Springer New York",
    number = "11",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Evidence-Based Current Surgical Practice

    T2 - Calculous Gallbladder Disease

    AU - Duncan, Casey B.

    AU - Riall, Taylor S.

    PY - 2012

    Y1 - 2012

    N2 - Background: Gallbladder disease is common and, if managed incorrectly, can lead to high rates of morbidity, mortality, and extraneous costs. The most common complications of gallstones include biliary colic, acute cholecystitis, common bile duct stones, and gallstone pancreatitis. Ultrasound is the initial imaging modality of choice. Additional diagnostic and therapeutic studies including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasound, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are not routinely required but may play a role in specific situations. Discussion: Biliary colic and acute cholecystitis are best treated with early laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients with common bile duct stones should be managed with cholecystectomy, either after or concurrent with endoscopic or surgical relief of obstruction and clearance of stones from the bile duct. Mild gallstone pancreatitis should be treated with cholecystectomy during the initial hospitalization to prevent recurrence. Emerging techniques for cholecystectomy include single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Early results in highly selected patients demonstrate the safety of these techniques. The management of complications of the gallbladder should be timely and evidence-based, and choice of procedures, particularly for common bile duct stones, is largely influenced by facility and surgeon factors.

    AB - Background: Gallbladder disease is common and, if managed incorrectly, can lead to high rates of morbidity, mortality, and extraneous costs. The most common complications of gallstones include biliary colic, acute cholecystitis, common bile duct stones, and gallstone pancreatitis. Ultrasound is the initial imaging modality of choice. Additional diagnostic and therapeutic studies including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, endoscopic ultrasound, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography are not routinely required but may play a role in specific situations. Discussion: Biliary colic and acute cholecystitis are best treated with early laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients with common bile duct stones should be managed with cholecystectomy, either after or concurrent with endoscopic or surgical relief of obstruction and clearance of stones from the bile duct. Mild gallstone pancreatitis should be treated with cholecystectomy during the initial hospitalization to prevent recurrence. Emerging techniques for cholecystectomy include single-incision laparoscopic surgery and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery. Early results in highly selected patients demonstrate the safety of these techniques. The management of complications of the gallbladder should be timely and evidence-based, and choice of procedures, particularly for common bile duct stones, is largely influenced by facility and surgeon factors.

    KW - Biliary

    KW - Evidence-based

    KW - Gallbladder

    KW - Surgery

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84869107141&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84869107141&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1007/s11605-012-2024-1

    DO - 10.1007/s11605-012-2024-1

    M3 - Article

    VL - 16

    SP - 2011

    EP - 2025

    JO - Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

    JF - Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery

    SN - 1091-255X

    IS - 11

    ER -