Evidence of natural transmission of group A rotavirus between domestic pigs and wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Japan

Kota Okadera, Masako Abe, Naoto Ito, Shigeki Morikawa, Ari Yamasaki, Tatsunori Masatani, Keisuke Nakagawa, Satoko Yamaoka, Makoto Sugiyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are a major cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young animals worldwide. RVAs have also been detected in several wild and zoo animals, indicating wide susceptibility of wild animals. However, the role of wild animals in the infection cycle of RVAs is unclear. Wild boars are indigenous in many countries in the world. Japanese wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax) have been migrating close to human habitats in Japan, indicating the possibility of natural transmission between domestic animals or humans and wild boars. We investigated infection of RVAs in wild boars in Japan to identify types of RVAs infecting wild animals. We obtained stool samples from 90 wild boars and detected a VP4 gene of RVAs by RT-semi-nested PCR. RVAs were detected in samples from four of the 90 wild boars. Nucleotide analyses of VP7 and VP4 genes revealed that the four strains belong to G9P[23], G4P[23], G9P[13] and G4P[6], suggesting a relation to porcine and human RVAs. We therefore characterized RVAs circulating among domestic pigs living in the same area as the wild boars. We collected stool samples from 82 domestic pigs. RVAs were detected in samples from 49 of the 82 domestic pigs. Phylogenetic and similarity analyses provided evidence for natural transmission between domestic pigs and wild boars. The results also suggested that natural reassortment events occurred before or after transmission between domestic pigs and wild boars. Our findings indicate the possibility that RVAs circulate among wild animals, humans and domestic animals in nature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)54-60
Number of pages7
JournalInfection, Genetics and Evolution
Volume20
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sus scrofa
Rotavirus
wild boars
pig
Japan
swine
wild animals
animal
Wild Animals
zoo
gene
domestic animals
Domestic Animals
zoo animals
sampling
phylogenetics
young animals
wild animal
Zoo Animals
infection

Keywords

  • Ecology
  • Reassortment
  • Rotavirus
  • Transmission
  • Wild animals
  • Wild boar

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Evidence of natural transmission of group A rotavirus between domestic pigs and wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Japan. / Okadera, Kota; Abe, Masako; Ito, Naoto; Morikawa, Shigeki; Yamasaki, Ari; Masatani, Tatsunori; Nakagawa, Keisuke; Yamaoka, Satoko; Sugiyama, Makoto.

In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, Vol. 20, 2013, p. 54-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Okadera, K, Abe, M, Ito, N, Morikawa, S, Yamasaki, A, Masatani, T, Nakagawa, K, Yamaoka, S & Sugiyama, M 2013, 'Evidence of natural transmission of group A rotavirus between domestic pigs and wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Japan', Infection, Genetics and Evolution, vol. 20, pp. 54-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.meegid.2013.07.029
Okadera, Kota ; Abe, Masako ; Ito, Naoto ; Morikawa, Shigeki ; Yamasaki, Ari ; Masatani, Tatsunori ; Nakagawa, Keisuke ; Yamaoka, Satoko ; Sugiyama, Makoto. / Evidence of natural transmission of group A rotavirus between domestic pigs and wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Japan. In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution. 2013 ; Vol. 20. pp. 54-60.
@article{c7e6c909d5fe422c883eae84e0712258,
title = "Evidence of natural transmission of group A rotavirus between domestic pigs and wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Japan",
abstract = "Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are a major cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young animals worldwide. RVAs have also been detected in several wild and zoo animals, indicating wide susceptibility of wild animals. However, the role of wild animals in the infection cycle of RVAs is unclear. Wild boars are indigenous in many countries in the world. Japanese wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax) have been migrating close to human habitats in Japan, indicating the possibility of natural transmission between domestic animals or humans and wild boars. We investigated infection of RVAs in wild boars in Japan to identify types of RVAs infecting wild animals. We obtained stool samples from 90 wild boars and detected a VP4 gene of RVAs by RT-semi-nested PCR. RVAs were detected in samples from four of the 90 wild boars. Nucleotide analyses of VP7 and VP4 genes revealed that the four strains belong to G9P[23], G4P[23], G9P[13] and G4P[6], suggesting a relation to porcine and human RVAs. We therefore characterized RVAs circulating among domestic pigs living in the same area as the wild boars. We collected stool samples from 82 domestic pigs. RVAs were detected in samples from 49 of the 82 domestic pigs. Phylogenetic and similarity analyses provided evidence for natural transmission between domestic pigs and wild boars. The results also suggested that natural reassortment events occurred before or after transmission between domestic pigs and wild boars. Our findings indicate the possibility that RVAs circulate among wild animals, humans and domestic animals in nature.",
keywords = "Ecology, Reassortment, Rotavirus, Transmission, Wild animals, Wild boar",
author = "Kota Okadera and Masako Abe and Naoto Ito and Shigeki Morikawa and Ari Yamasaki and Tatsunori Masatani and Keisuke Nakagawa and Satoko Yamaoka and Makoto Sugiyama",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1016/j.meegid.2013.07.029",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "54--60",
journal = "Infection, Genetics and Evolution",
issn = "1567-1348",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evidence of natural transmission of group A rotavirus between domestic pigs and wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Japan

AU - Okadera, Kota

AU - Abe, Masako

AU - Ito, Naoto

AU - Morikawa, Shigeki

AU - Yamasaki, Ari

AU - Masatani, Tatsunori

AU - Nakagawa, Keisuke

AU - Yamaoka, Satoko

AU - Sugiyama, Makoto

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are a major cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young animals worldwide. RVAs have also been detected in several wild and zoo animals, indicating wide susceptibility of wild animals. However, the role of wild animals in the infection cycle of RVAs is unclear. Wild boars are indigenous in many countries in the world. Japanese wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax) have been migrating close to human habitats in Japan, indicating the possibility of natural transmission between domestic animals or humans and wild boars. We investigated infection of RVAs in wild boars in Japan to identify types of RVAs infecting wild animals. We obtained stool samples from 90 wild boars and detected a VP4 gene of RVAs by RT-semi-nested PCR. RVAs were detected in samples from four of the 90 wild boars. Nucleotide analyses of VP7 and VP4 genes revealed that the four strains belong to G9P[23], G4P[23], G9P[13] and G4P[6], suggesting a relation to porcine and human RVAs. We therefore characterized RVAs circulating among domestic pigs living in the same area as the wild boars. We collected stool samples from 82 domestic pigs. RVAs were detected in samples from 49 of the 82 domestic pigs. Phylogenetic and similarity analyses provided evidence for natural transmission between domestic pigs and wild boars. The results also suggested that natural reassortment events occurred before or after transmission between domestic pigs and wild boars. Our findings indicate the possibility that RVAs circulate among wild animals, humans and domestic animals in nature.

AB - Group A rotaviruses (RVAs) are a major cause of acute dehydrating diarrhea in infants and young animals worldwide. RVAs have also been detected in several wild and zoo animals, indicating wide susceptibility of wild animals. However, the role of wild animals in the infection cycle of RVAs is unclear. Wild boars are indigenous in many countries in the world. Japanese wild boars (Sus scrofa leucomystax) have been migrating close to human habitats in Japan, indicating the possibility of natural transmission between domestic animals or humans and wild boars. We investigated infection of RVAs in wild boars in Japan to identify types of RVAs infecting wild animals. We obtained stool samples from 90 wild boars and detected a VP4 gene of RVAs by RT-semi-nested PCR. RVAs were detected in samples from four of the 90 wild boars. Nucleotide analyses of VP7 and VP4 genes revealed that the four strains belong to G9P[23], G4P[23], G9P[13] and G4P[6], suggesting a relation to porcine and human RVAs. We therefore characterized RVAs circulating among domestic pigs living in the same area as the wild boars. We collected stool samples from 82 domestic pigs. RVAs were detected in samples from 49 of the 82 domestic pigs. Phylogenetic and similarity analyses provided evidence for natural transmission between domestic pigs and wild boars. The results also suggested that natural reassortment events occurred before or after transmission between domestic pigs and wild boars. Our findings indicate the possibility that RVAs circulate among wild animals, humans and domestic animals in nature.

KW - Ecology

KW - Reassortment

KW - Rotavirus

KW - Transmission

KW - Wild animals

KW - Wild boar

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84883546773&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84883546773&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.meegid.2013.07.029

DO - 10.1016/j.meegid.2013.07.029

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 54

EP - 60

JO - Infection, Genetics and Evolution

JF - Infection, Genetics and Evolution

SN - 1567-1348

ER -