Examining the effects of an outpatient palliative care consultation on symptom burden, depression, and quality of life in patients with symptomatic heart failure

Lorraine S. Evangelista, Dawn Lombardo, Shaista Malik, Jennifer Ballard-Hernandez, Marjan Motie, Solomon Liao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

77 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We conducted this prospective comparative study to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of a palliative care consultation along with standard heart failure care in an outpatient setting regarding symptom burden, depression, and quality of life (QOL). Methods and Results: Thirty-six patients (53.6 ± 8.3 years old) were referred for an outpatient palliative care consultation after discharge. Changes in symptom burden, depression, and QOL at 3 months were compared with 36 patients with symptomatic heart failure matched on age, sex, race, and New York Heart Association functional class. Improvements were observed in symptom burden, depression, and QOL in both groups over time (all P < .005), but were more pronounced in patients receiving a palliative care consultation (all P < .035). Conclusions: A palliative care consultation may reduce symptom burden and depression and enhance QOL in patients with symptomatic heart failure. Larger-scale randomized controlled trials sufficiently powered to assess clinical outcomes are warranted to determine the efficacy of palliative care services in outpatient settings regarding symptom distress, depression, and QOL in patients with symptomatic heart failure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)894-899
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cardiac Failure
Volume18
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Keywords

  • Heart failure
  • depression
  • palliative care
  • quality of life
  • symptom burden

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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