Exercise training modifies ghrelin and adiponectin concentrations and is related to inflammation in older adults

Melissa M. Markofski, Andres E. Carrillo, Kyle L. Timmerman, Kristofer Jennings, Paul M. Coen, Brandt D. Pence, Michael G. Flynn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to observe exercise training-induced effects on adiponectin, leptin, and ghrelin. Twenty-nine older, healthy participants were classified as physically active (comparison group: N = 15, 70.9±1.2 years) or physically inactive (exercise group: N = 14, 70.5±1.4 years). Exercise group participants completed 12 weeks of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training, whereas comparison group participants maintained their current level of exercise and served as a physically active comparison group. Monocyte phenotype, as well as serum ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor II were analyzed prior to and following the 12-week period. Ghrelin and adiponectin increased 47% and 55%, respectively, in exercise group participants following exercise training. Percent change in ghrelin (post and pre) was negatively correlated with the percent change in CD14+CD16+ monocytes (post and pre) in exercise group participants. Despite no changes in body mass, these data contribute to evidence for the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)675-681
Number of pages7
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume69
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ghrelin
Adiponectin
Exercise
Inflammation
Leptin
Monocytes
Resistance Training
Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors
Healthy Volunteers
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Phenotype

Keywords

  • Adipokine
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Exercise training modifies ghrelin and adiponectin concentrations and is related to inflammation in older adults. / Markofski, Melissa M.; Carrillo, Andres E.; Timmerman, Kyle L.; Jennings, Kristofer; Coen, Paul M.; Pence, Brandt D.; Flynn, Michael G.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 69, No. 6, 2014, p. 675-681.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Markofski, Melissa M. ; Carrillo, Andres E. ; Timmerman, Kyle L. ; Jennings, Kristofer ; Coen, Paul M. ; Pence, Brandt D. ; Flynn, Michael G. / Exercise training modifies ghrelin and adiponectin concentrations and is related to inflammation in older adults. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2014 ; Vol. 69, No. 6. pp. 675-681.
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